The Quotable Round-Up #100

og0ooopWow! It’s our 100th Qoutable Round-Up! What’s special about this post is that today is the  501 st year of the Reformation. Yay! Another is the book we are quoting is from Tim Keller’s new book The Prodigal Prophet. Very controversial author and book, but its a pretty good read. So here’s seven of them and next time I’ll post another batch:

“Because of his self-substitution, we can have life. To the degree you grasp what Jesus did for you, and rest in the salvation he bought for you, to that degree this pattern of substitutionary sacrifice and love will be reproduced in your relationships. And you will become the kind of person the world desperately need.”

“Many today reject the doctrine of substitutionary atonement. They believe it depicts a loving Jesus who extracts forgiveness from a wrathful, reluctant God. Some have called this “divine child abuse.” But that insults Jesus. It demotes him into some kind of lesser being, and it is a denial of one of the cardinal doctrines of the Bible and Christianity, namely that there is only one God who exists in three persons, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The three persons are not three Gods, but one. So the name “Jesus” means “God saves,” and his name “Immanuel” (Matthew 1:21–23) means “God with us.” Paul says “that God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ, not counting people’s sins against them” (2 Corinthians 5:19).”

“There’s love at the heart of our storms. If you turn to God through faith in Christ, he won’t let you sink. Why not? Because the only storm that can really destroy—the storm of divine justice and judgment on sin and evil—will never come upon you.”

“If you want to understand your own behavior, you must understand that all sin against God is grounded in a refusal to believe that God is more dedicated to our good, and more aware of what that is, than we are. We distrust God because we assume he is not truly for us, that if we give him complete control, we will be miserable.”

“We were made in “the image of God” (Genesis 1:26–27). There can be no image without an original of which the image is a reflection. “To be in the image” means that human beings were not created to stand alone. We must get our significance and security from something of ultimate value outside us. To be created in God’s image means we must live for the true God or we will have to make something else God and orbit our lives around that.”

“We think that if we are religiously observant, virtuous, and good, then we’ve paid our dues, as it were. Now God can’t just ask anything of us—he owes us. He is obligated to answer our prayers and bless us. This is not moving toward him in grateful joy, glad surrender, and love, but is instead a way of controlling God and, as a result, keeping him at arm’s length.”

“Someone might object that the world has no right to rebuke the church, but there is biblical warrant for doing exactly that. In Jesus’s Sermon on the Mount he said that the world would see the good deeds of believers and glorify God (Matthew 5:16). The world will not see who our Lord is if we do not live as we ought. In the words of one book we are “The Church Before the Watching World.” We deserve the critique of the world if the church does not exhibit visible love in practical deeds.”

The Quotable Round-Up #99

jza5tccHeads up guys! Time for some 7 awesome quotes from a Christian book. This time we shall enjoy quotes from “Advance!” by Tim Challies. If you were blessed by this booklet, please consider getting it on Amazon or at your nearest bookstore! Grace and Peace!

“The Jesus of the three years of public ministry was formed during the 30 years of private obscurity. The 10 percent of his life that was carefully recorded cannot be separated from the 90 percent of his life that was not.”

“The number one priority for young Christians is to advance in character. Life is not over at 30 but just beginning. The teens and 20s are not the time to live a whole life but to prepare for a whole life. In these years, young Christians need to prepare themselves for the rest of life by laying a foundation of godly character that will sustain them for the many years to come.”

“Today, we hear of the importance of following our hearts, of being true to ourselves, of living according to our own standards. The Bible calls us to the exact opposite, to follow God’s heart, to be true to him, and to live according to his standards. Self-approval is meaningless and deadly if it comes at the expense of God’s approval.”

“As a young Christian, you will have many opportunities to serve God by serving his people. Take them! Enjoy them! Make the most of them! Begin even now to use your gifts, talents, time, energy, and enthusiasm for the good of others and the glory of God.”

“The best use of these years is not to stack up accomplishments for God but to joyfully pursue God through godly character. Yet as I call for young Christians to focus more on character than accomplishment, I certainly do not wish to advocate apathy. This is not a call for low expectations, but for expectations that are rightly focused and properly prioritized.”

“You can prepare by learning Scripture and theology, listening carefully to every sermon every Sunday, being consistent in your personal devotions, and reading good books. God can use every bit of wisdom you have. The fact is, God cannot work with what you do not have, and these years are ideal for preparing yourself to be used by him. Make this a time of preparation.”

“Your teens and 20s will be put to the best and highest use if you make them a time of sanctification. Even when you are a teen or young adult, you can make bold steps in identifying and overcoming sin and equally bold steps in embracing righteousness.”

 

 

The Digital Round-Up # 25

From its long hiatus the original Digital Round-Up is back.  Fresh and relevant content for you to read and be edified.

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FREE “Apostasy from the Gospel” by John Owens– A latest free offering from Monergism.

50 John MacArthur Quotes – We know that John MacArthur has been on the spotlight because of his views on social justice. But thats another story. Here’s 50 quotes from  Lolo Johnny from various topics.

The Case for FB Theologians -You might find them all over Facebook and sometimes creating theological debates on groups. However, they can do good service for the church and God. Check out this interesting article from an FB friend.

*In case you missed these : 5 Christian Podcast You Should Be Listening Right Now, 7 Awesome Ways to Learn Church History Online for Free, 7 Short But Excellent Christian Books I Have Read, 5 Important Things to Do Before Starting to Read A Book, 3 Essential Reasons to Re-Read Your Favorite Book. 

10 Signs the Christian Authors You’re Following Are (Subtly) Teaching Unbiblical Ideas – Natasha Crain really hit the nail on this article. We as Christians are book lovers however our favorite writers may be adding some unbiblical stuff over their books. Here’s 10 signs to know it.

Why Should I Tell Others About Christ When My Life Sucks –  Two valid reasons why we should. Great article from Credo House.

Better Than I Deserve – A much better reply to “How are you?”, its a biblical response that points out the Christian life.

*In case you missed these: Collecting the Past: Delighting Grace Interviews Caleb of Log College Press,  Accessible Apologetics: Delighting Grace Interviews Jason L. Petersen, Squad Goals: Delighting Grace Interviews Theron St. John, Tested by Time: Delighting Grace Interviews Dr. Isabelo Magalit.

How Do I Choose Good Books and Grow My Library? – Excellent advice from a prolific writer and book lover, John Piper. Not only does he gives us tips but recommends what books we should get.

6 Small Tweaks for Better Church Photography – For those who are in charge of taking pictures on church events, try these awesome tips to level up your church photography skills.

Stop Looking to the Bible for Fortune-Cookie Wisdom from Crossway on Vimeo.

 

 

 

The Quotable Round-Up #97

mov8lgvHeads up guys! time for some 7 awesome quotes from a Christian book. This time we shall enjoy quotes from “10 Questions to Diagnose Your Spiritual Health” by Don Whitney. If you were blessed by this book, please consider getting it on Amazon or at your nearest bookstore! Grace and Peace!

“Do you thirst for God? Thirst is a God-planned part of the growth of a soul toward its heavenly home.”

“The reason a person thirsts for God is because the Holy Spirit is at work within him. If you are a Christian, two people live in your body-you and the Holy Spirit. As the apostle Paul explained, “Do you not know that your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit who is in you, whom you have from God, and you are not your own?” (1 Corinthians 6:19). And the Holy Spirit is not passive within you.”

“Wherever we go, whatever decisions are before us, the way of life should be illuminated by God’s Word. To live otherwise is to walk in darkness.”

“Read the Bible daily and do not close it until you know at least one thing God would have you do in response to your reading. This response might involve something new to believe, a habit to begin or break, a prayer to offer, a conversation to initiate, a letter or E-mail to send, a phone call to make, a spiritual discipline to practice, or something else. Read the Bible for application, not merely for information.”

“Love is the badge and character of Christianity.”

“Jesus came primarily to save sinners forever, not merely to heal their short-lived bodies. His greatest display of love for us was in His death, for through it we experience the love of God unto eternal life. And the most loving thing we can ever do for anyone is give them the words that can lead to immortality in a radiantly glorious body.”

“Delight in imitating God. This is not a mystical platitude or a new ager’s aspiration. The Bible speaks plainly about imitating God by showing love: “Therefore be imitators of God as dear children. And walk in love, as Christ also has loved us and given Himself for us” (Ephesians 5:1-2).”

The Quotable Round-Up #94

f11jjqtHeads up guys! time for some 7 awesome quotes from a Christian book. This time we shall enjoy quotes from “Discerning Your Call to Ministry” by Jason K. Allen. If you were blessed by this book, please consider getting it on Amazon or at your nearest bookstore! God bless and Peace!

“God intended complementarity between the genders, both within the home and the church. While both men and women are endowed with equal worth and dignity before God, in His unsearchable wisdom He established the office of pastor/elder for qualified men only.”

“Churches don’t typically attempt to pay ministers a secular market rate for a comparable profession—nor should they—and this helps keep men who love money out of the pulpit.
On a deeper, attitudinal level, if money is a driving ambition, it will cloud your judgment and compromise your ability to discern ministry opportunities. In other words, if you “follow the money,” you’ll likely follow it right out of the ministry—and perhaps even into ruin.”

“The health of the church rises or falls with the pulpit because it’s God’s Word that builds up a church (Eph. 4:11–14). The pastor’s task is a weighty, consequential one.”

“Pastoral ministry is first and foremost heart work. God gives the pastor sheep to feed, love, protect, and lead.”

“You don’t need to be perfect to be a minister, but you do have to be above reproach. When God calls a man to ministry, he also qualifies him—that is, He tests a man according to His own Word.”

“To pursue ministry but not have a passion for the gospel and Great Commission is like pursuing medicine but not liking patients. I suppose you can manage along, but you will lack fruitfulness and joy. Most troubling of all, you will hinder God’s divine plan for reaching the world for Christ.”

“…the person most likely called to ministry is the person already practicing it; and the one who is most likely to know God’s blessing is the one already experiencing it. Often, by the time you choose to enter the ministry, you realize you’ve already chosen it in countless aspirations and forms.”

7 Awesome Ways to Learn Church History Online for Free

e0vmeka Uruguayan journalist Eduardo Galeano once said “History never really says goodbye. History says, ‘See you later.’ Well it depends on what history we want to welcome. Its either mistakes or victories of the past that will be knocking at our doors.  However we can anticipate the comeback when we look at history. Christians should study church history. Here’s 7 ways to learn church history without breaking the bank. Of course, nothing can beat having a seminary training about church history and I highly encourage you to do so. However, for those who can’t go to a seminary or even buy a book in church history, this list can be a good place to know about this important subject:

1. Get church history daily in your inbox – Christian History Institute offers a daily  It Happened Today sort of a”this day in history” thing simply by subscribing to their e-mail list (scroll down to the bottom till you find the subscribe box.)

2. Listen to a 5 minute podcast – Aside from the cool Cranberries intro, this weekly podcast on church history hosted by Dr. Stephen Nichols takes a slice of church history and discusses how God works to events, people and places and how it’s relevant to our time. 5 Minutes of Church History is non technical in approach and because it’s brief, you can easily tuck it to your podcast listening list.

     Now for some hardcore stuff….

3. Watch lectures over Youtube – Ryan Reeves church history lectures are superb. If you check his Youtube channel, you’ll see his 64 k subscribers and some of his 20-30 minute videos had been viewed 500 k times. Very impressive. His videos consist of pictures and notes for viewers to catch the important words, names and events. The audio and images are great. Ryan Reeves  Historical Theology for Everyone is a must watch!

If you want, however, to see an actual lecture, you can also check Carl E. Trueman’s lectures on The Reformation presented in The Master’s Seminary.

4. Listen to a Sunday School series – Tommy Nelson of Denton Bible Church, gives a series simply titled Church History, in engaging and exciting way, considering the dread of studying historical stuff.  The audio quality is good and you can feel the churchy setting to were this series is given.

Moving to Sermon Audio, I would like to recommend two Sunday School series that tackles church history. First is from Brian Borgman,pastor of Grace Community Church Nevada, A Survey of Church History . Love the audio quality and how Borgman articulate the teachings which are not intimidating. Last one is from Dr. James White Church History Series .  If you know James White, his debates and podcast, you’ll find this at par from what he dishes out. The audio quality is not that good but if you like what you hear and like White you’ll gonna stick around for this series.

5. Download a Seminary app – Reformed Theological Seminary has an app that you can download in various app stores for free. The lecturer is Dr. S. Donald Fortson and you can access these lectures on i-Tunes U from your i-phone and i-Pad.

6. Sign up on an online seminary level course – You can check out audio lectures of Ancient and Mediaval History and Reformation and Modern History courses at Covenant Theological Seminary. You have to create an account to access it complete with downloadable MP3, transcript and study guides. You can check other seminaries that has church history courses by clicking here.

7. Dowload e-books on Church History – If your’re not into the audio and video lectures, you can download free e-books on church history. A simple search on Mogernism.com yields some books that you can check out.

So thats my list, so what’s yours? Kindly comment in the comment section on what should be added on the list. By the way, I would like to thank Dead Men Community, TCB Family and the Baptist Review Facebook Groups for giving me some of what has been included on the list. It really helped me to write this article and gave me ways to self-study Church History.

Book Review: Faker by Nicholas T. McDonald

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photo grabbed from The Good Book

No one wants a faker.

In this age of social media we can easily hide real selves because we want to project a better us. So we put on the mask that will not just make us feel good but rise above anyone else. Teens and young ones sometimes struggle with this issue.

Yes, the struggle is real.

“Faker” is a short but spot on book by Nick McDonald.  In the book he admits being a former faker. He tells his story of his fakery that we can easily relate to. He became prideful and looks other down behind a mask. The problem with that he needs to maintain his status quo but ends up still feeling empty.  However that’s half of the book is all about. This is not your typical pep talk, think positive or self help for teens. In its 7 chapters the book, Nick expound Luke 18: 9-14 the story of Pharisee and the tax collector. As you read this book, Nick unleashed the power of the Scripture that will hold you till the last page. “Faker” hits the root cause of our pretension: sin and provides the solution: the gospel.  Well that something considering this is a book for teens and young ones. He even discuss the word propitiation, you might think it will turn off a teen reading the book. Well it won’t. The book ends with a plea to drop the mask and come to God.

“Faker” and “Something More” by Theron St. John (which I book reviewed previously) are spot on when it comes to addressing the younger generation by its unique way of presenting the gospel that doesn’t have to be watered down. The cool book design, artwork and pop culture references which are awesome in this book really helps the lesson stick to our mind. However  those elements doesn’t   overwhelmed  “Faker” because that’s not the star of this book but the message of Luke 18 that young people badly needs to hear. Highly recommended resource to reach out young people and teens.

My verdict:

4.5 out of 5

The Quotable Round-Up #90

f11jjqtHeads up guys! time for some 7 awesome quotes from a Christian book. This time we shall enjoy quotes from the book “Faker” by Nick McDonald. If you find these nuggets of wisdom superb, please get the book at your favorite bookstore or log in to Amazon. God bless and Peace!

“At the cross we see these two stunning realities about God: He is the holy King and Judge of our world. His overwhelming purity demands death for sin. He dethrones us.”

“…God, in his goodness, gave up a relationship more precious than anything you and I can imagine. It was a relationship better than the best marriage. Better than the most googley-eyed date. Better than the best BFFs ever. It was a perfect, intimate relationship that existed forever, between a perfect Son and a perfect Father.”

“Through the propitiation of Jesus’ blood, we, like the tax collector, can be declared good. Jesus Christ defeated the death we deserve by dying in our place, and then by rising from the dead three days later. The victory is won. The battle is over. When we place our faith in him, we are united to his death and resurrection forever—because he died, we can live.”

“So to say “God is love” is true, but incomplete. Love isn’t god—God is, among other things, love. He isn’t a god who loves like we do. His love is “other”: it’s better than our niceness. It own from his volcanic, beautiful purity.”

“Whenever I’m tempted to think that my failures are devastating, or think I made myself successful, I can look to this truth: God, the King and Judge, is truly in control. Not me. He gives, and takes away. Whenever I’m tempted to fret about pleasing people, I can remember: “These people don’t have ultimate power. God does. He controls my life, not them.”

“See, the God of the Bible is a God I wouldn’t have made up. He’s a God who’s over me, not a god who’s under my thumb. He’s a God who confronts me about my claim to the throne of my life.”

“The Bible says the problem with self-righteousness is this: the instant we say: “I’ll be good/right/worthy of love according to me,” is the instant we say: “I am the king and judge over my own life.”

 

The Digital Round-Up # 22

myptv2kHey folks! Prepare for another round of the “The Digital Round-Up” as we serve you interesting articles, freebies and videos. And if you’re enjoying this stuff, please do tell us on the comment section. So buckle up and enjoy the thrill.

FREE “Psalm 139” by Charles Spurgeon – an excerpt from the Treasury of David also by Spurgeon,  its send the message to readers of God’s intent to overthrow the power of darkness and shows the sovereign God over evil.

Heidelberg Catechism in Tagalog – I never knew that this beloved catechism has a Tagalog version. I read it and it pierced my heart.

Smart phones and Reading Habits – Make sure on what we are scrolling on a screen is healthy to our minds and not just scrolling us to our deaths.

Two extremes to be avoided in preaching –  Not gonna spoil to you what are the two extremes but this is a great article.

25 Things God said to the church – The church through out the centuries shows her flaws and all however God still loves the church and here’s what He said about it.

Top Five Logical Fallacies in the Social Justice Movement – Knowing these false logical arguments we can see the factual than the emotional zeal of the movement.

Seeking Revelation in Bourdain’s Parts Unknown –  The beauty of diversity Anthony Bourdain discovered are appetizers for something more in God’s plan of redemption.

 

 

Book Review: Something More by Theron St. John

xkak8tvThere are books that rely on heavy arguments and controversial issues to make a case for the need of the gospel. It can be on the issue of abortion, same sex marriage or the prosperity gospel. Sometimes it is tackled pages upon pages that is grueling to read. Theron St. John’s Something More diverts from those books and dishes out answers to ones purpose in life.

Something More is a relevant and fresh book geared for young adults who are in pursuit of their dreams. Caught up in their goals in life they neglect ultimate purpose that is found in God. Theron St. John step by step, real life stories after stories, in every chapter with laser focus unravels the reality of finding that purpose and eventually joy. It is a straight trail with the end goal that is to present the need of salvation. A brief book that hits the heart of the millenials to stop and consider that there is something more.

St. John wrote Something More with an evangelistic tone that doesn’t cram the Bible on someones throat, bog down someone with theological jargon or too preachy. Neither does this book succumbed to a water down gospel. On the contrary it does still points to the gospel and God. Something More presented the gospel in a way that  half of it feels like a book and half of it is like a friendly conversation.   I’m totally hands down on how St. John wrote it and looking forward for more of this kind of stuff in future books he will release.

If you want to give a book to someone who is in college or just starting to work then this book is highly recommended. If you want a book that is not hard hitting but still gives a spark of hope to people who are burden by their pursuit of their dreams this book is for them. Something More caters to new believers also who are connecting their personal pursuit with what God wants them to have.

4.5 out of 5

Buy the book at Lulu.com