The Quotable Round-Up #87

tpn6bjcHowdy! It’s a great day to sit down, chill and sip your favorite drink! And while at it, add some awesomeness in your day by reading our latest collection of quotes.  This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the book “The Potter’s Freedom” by James R. White. And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“The religions of men, Roman Catholicism, and Arminianism, all share one thing in common: the deep desire to maintain the ability of man to control the work of God in salvation and always have the “final say.” The blunt assertion of Christ refutes this error. The fact is, outside of the divine action of drawing the elect to Christ none would come to Him. It is beyond the capacity of the fallen man.”

“All men would be left in the hopeless position of “unable to come” unless God acts, and He does by drawing men unto Christ. Outside of this divine enablement no man can come to Christ. No man can “will” to come to Christ outside of this divine drawing.”

“Why is one man raised to eternal life and another left to eternal destruction? The Scriptures offer an answer that is satisfying to the believer, but insufficient for the person unwilling to trust in God’s goodness. What is the basis of God’s act of predestination? It is “according to the kind intention of His will.” Each word is important. It is His will, not our will. And remember, this is speaking not of some general plan to “save” so that it is God who “initiates” but man who actuates. This is the specific predestination of individuals to sonship. The basis of this specific decree is God’s will. No mention is found of man’s will.”

“Synergism is the hallmark of man’s religions: monergism the mark of the biblical gospel.”

“When the Scriptures say that men are spiritually dead, we are not to understand this to mean that they are spiritually inactive. Men are active in their rebellion, active in their suppression of the truth, active in their sin. Instead, spiritual death refers to alienation from God, the destruction of the positive, active desire to do what is right in God’s sight, and most importantly, the ability to do what is good and holy.”

“Reformed theologians insist that for one to be free as a creature then one must have first and foremost a sovereign Creator. God is the free and sovereign Creator and acts freely in that realm that is His: we are mere creatures, never sovereign, never autonomous (i.e., without law, without a superior authority), but responsible within the realm of our createdness.”

“The Christian heart is glad to confess, “Salvation is of the Lord.” All of it. In completeness. In perfection. The God who decrees all things saves perfectly. Salvation is a divine act, a divine work. It is centered upon God, not upon man. It is God’s glory, not man’s, that is at stake. The God-centeredness of the gospel is what makes the biblical teaching so fundamentally different than all the religions of men.”

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7 Short But Excellent Christian Books I Have Read

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(This article was previously posted at Top Christian Books (TCB Media). This is the short version of it.) 

Forget those thick and bulky books that you consider an essential read for Christians. Here are short, 100 pages less but excellent books that you should read. Also I included links to “The Quota ble Round-Up” that features awesome quotes from these books.

1.) “Apologetics Made Simple” by Jason L. Petersen – Petersen presents 5 keys on which apologetics in this straight forward book. If the word “apologetics scares you, let this brief book bare the essentials that is easy to remember and easy to apply.   (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

2.) “A Primer on Free Will” by John Gerstner – A short book but an excellent treatment of free will. John Gerstner doesn’t just bombard us with biblical jargons and verses but started this book by giving a great illustration that will really stoke you out. If you want to grasp free will this book is an excellent one. (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

3.) “A Christian’s Pocket Guide to Good Works and Rewards” by Mark Jones – Mark Jones sets out the biblical view on good works and rewards which is sometimes sets confusion among Christians who don’t want to fall into legalism and antinomianism. (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

4.)  “Church History for Modern Ministry” by Dayton Hartman – Is church history relevant to our modern day ministry? How will it help our Christian living or apologetics from people, places and events that are so detached to our times? This book will help you understand the importance of knowing our history.

5.) “Transgender” by Vaughn Roberts – A brief introduction on a very controversial subject. Vaughn Roberts delivers  important points enough for a Christian to consider this issue.

6.) “Discerning Truth” by Jason Lisle – This maybe a companion book to “Ultimate Proof of Creation” but it’s a great read and a standalone too. Much of the debate between atheist and Christians specifically on the origins, are sometimes based on faulty logical statements. Dr. Lisle list out logical fallacies and how can a Christian these statements in this short but powerful book. (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

7.)  “Why Bother with Church?” by Sam Allberry – Church life is essential to the believer as part of his spiritual growth. Sam Allberry gives a believer reasons why church is important in this short but great book by answering common questions Christians always ask. (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

Do you have your own list of favorite short books? Please share it on the comment section.

 

The Quotable Round-Up #84

tpn6bjcHowdy! It’s a great day to sit down, chill and sip your favorite drink! And while at it, add some awesomeness in your day by reading our latest collection of quotes.  This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the book “What’s Your Worldview?” by James N. Anderson. And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“Indeed, one of the toughest challenges Atheist worldviews face is explaining how anything can be objectively good or bad if there’s no God to serve as the ultimate standard of goodness. The same goes for objective meaning and purpose: if there’s no God, then it seems that the universe can have no ultimate meaning, purpose, or direction. The universe just is what it is and does what it does; there’s really no good or bad about it, objectively speaking.”

“Unpopular though the idea may be today, the Bible teaches the polar opposite of Pelagianism: we are born in a sinful and spiritually dead state, unable to live good moral lives apart from divine grace. Indeed, Jesus himself preached the shocking idea that heaven is for immoral people who admit that they’re bad and cry out for God’s mercy and forgiveness rather than for moral people who think they’re good enough to deserve it.”

“In effect, Skeptics want us to believe that they alone have discerned some universal truth about human knowledge, namely, that there isn’t any human knowledge. But do they claim to know that? If they do, they’re not being consistently skeptical; specifically, they’re not being skeptical about their own claim to know a universal truth. On the other hand, if they say they don’t know that Skepticism is correct, why should we take their position seriously? By their own profession, their opinions about human knowledge are no better than anyone else’s.”

“There’s no way to be a consistent Relativist. Just consider the basic claim of Relativism: “There is no objective truth.” Is that claim itself supposed to be objectively true? If so, it obviously contradicts itself! But if the basic claim of Relativism isn’t objectively true, Relativism seems to forfeit any right to be universally accepted or meaningfully debated.”

“On closer examination, Pluralism turns out to be just as “exclusive” and “intolerant” as many traditional religions, if not more so, simply because it cannot accommodate any religion that rejects its distinctive perspective on religion. If Pluralism is right, other religions must be quite wrong. So much for “live and let live”! By excluding non-Pluralist religions, Pluralism exposes itself as just one more religious viewpoint in competition with all the others.”

“Your worldview represents your most fundamental beliefs and assumptions about the universe you inhabit. It reflects how you would answer all the “big questions” of human existence, the fundamental questions we ask about life, the universe, and everything.”

 

The Quotable Round-Up #83

tpn6bjcHello guys! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the late Jerry Bridges book titled “Who Am I?” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“The good news of the gospel is that Jesus took our place on God’s death row and actually died in our place to satisfy the justice of God so that God might fully pardon us without violating his justice.”
— Jerry Bridges

“On our good days we think God must surely be pleased with us and is smiling at us. We forget, as we saw earlier, that all our righteous deeds are like polluted garments in the sight of God (Isaiah 64:6). On our bad days we tend to think we have lost the favor of God because of our sin. We forget that he no longer counts our sin against us because Jesus has already born that sin in his body on the cross.”

“(This) faith is like the two sides of a coin. On one side is “renunciation.” On the other side is “reliance.” In order to trust in Christ we must first of all renounce any trust in our own perceived righteousness. Then we must rely completely on the finished work of Christ in both his life and death. That’s how we are justified.”

“In the plan and purpose of God the Father, he caused Jesus to become sin for us—again, with Jesus’ cooperation, despite the unimaginable anguish and torment involved. God took all of our collective sin down through the ages, all of it, and laid it upon Christ. Every sin that we commit in thought, word, deed, and motive was heaped upon him. He was made to be sin.”

“By his perfectly obedient life over thirty-three years, Christ earned the blessings of God. By his death on the cross he experienced the curse for disobedience. As our representative, all that he did in both his life and death accrues to our benefit.”

“Everything good in me or around me, whether spiritual or material, is a gift from God. More importantly, as one who has trusted in Christ as my Savior, I know that he has taken on himself the accountability for all my sins and has fully paid the penalty for my every act of disobedience.”

“When we begin to answer the question, “Who am I?”, we need to start with the most basic truth about us: we are created beings. “So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them” (Genesis 1:27). While being made in God’s image puts us on an entirely different plane from any of the animals, we are still creatures. This makes us both dependent upon God and accountable to God.”

The Quotable Round-Up #81

tpn6bjcHello guys! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring fresh quotes from R. C. Sproul’s book titled “The Truth of the Cross” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“It is a dreadful thing to fall into the hands of a holy God Who’s wrathful. But there is no wrath for those whose sins have been paid. That is what salvation is all about.”
— R. C. Sproul

“The Greek word crisis means “judgment.” And the crisis of which Jesus preached was the crisis of an impending judgment of the world, at which point God is going to pour out His wrath
against the unredeemed, the ungodly, and the impenitent. The only hope of escape from that outpouring of wrath is to be covered by the atonement of Christ.”
— R. C. Sproul

“The idea of being the Substitute in offering an atonement to satisfy the demands of God’s law for others was something Christ understood as His mission from the moment He entered this world and took upon Himself a human nature. He came from heaven as the gift of the Father for the express purpose of working out redemption as our Substitute, doing for us what we could not possibly do for ourselves.”
— R. C. Sproul

“Christ came and paid the ransom in order to secure the release of His people, who were held captive to sin. Christ gave this ransom voluntarily, that He might redeem us from our bondage and bring us to Himself as His beloved bride.”
— R. C. Sproul

“When the Bible speaks of ransom, it speaks of that ransom being paid not to a criminal but to the One Who is owed the price for redemption, the One Who is the offended party in the whole complex of sin—the Father. Jesus didn’t negotiate with Satan for our salvation. Instead, He offered Himself in payment to the Father for us. By so offering Himself, He made redemption for His people, redeeming them from captivity.”
— R. C. Sproul

“It is important that we understand that God manifests no enmity toward us. He has never broken a promise. He has never violated a covenant. He has never sworn a vow to us that He failed to pay. He has never treated a human being in this world unjustly. He has never violated us as creatures. In short, He has kept His side of the relationship perfectly. But we have violated Him. We are the ones who violate the creature-Creator relationship. By our sin, we show ourselves to be God’s enemies. Therefore, with respect to enmity, He is the injured party, the violated One.”
— R. C. Sproul

“What do we mean when we speak of God’s justice? In the ancient Jewish mind, justice was never abstract. That’s why, in the Old Testament, justice inevitably was linked with the concept of righteousness. Righteousness means doing what is right. Therefore, God’s justice has to do with His internal righteousness, His character, which defines everything He does. God never acts according to injustice. He never violates any of the standards or canons of righteousness. A simple definition of God’s justice is “His eternal, immutable commitment always to do what is right.”
— R. C. Sproul

The Quotable Round-Up # 79

tpn6bjcHello guys! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring fresh quotes from R. C. Sproul’s “The Consequence of Ideas” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“Philosophy was born in the ancient quest for ultimate reality, the reality that transcends the proximate and commonplace and that defines and explains the data of everyday experience.”

“For Heraclitus the process of change is not chaotic but is orchestrated by “God.” I put God in quotes because for Heraclitus “God” is not a personal being but more like an impersonal force. Flux is the product of a universal reason Heraclitus calls the logos. Here we see the philosophical roots of the logos concept that the apostle John appropriated to define the preexistent and eternal person of the Godhead who became incarnate. It would be a serious mistake, however, simply to equate or identify John’s use of logos with that of Greek philosophy, because John filled the term with Hebrew categories of thought. At the same time it would be an equally serious mistake to separate completely John’s use of the term from Greek thought.”

“The true philosopher cannot be satisfied with empirical or sensory knowledge, which is not ideal knowledge but the shadowy knowledge of opinion—the “knowledge” of the cave. The true philosopher reaches for the essence of things, for the ideals. This allows the philosopher to rise above the superficiality of Sophism and the skepticism of the materialists. He seeks the universal and is dissatisfied with a list of particulars. After discerning that a particular object is beautiful or virtuous, he moves beyond that particular to discover the very essence of beauty and virtue.”

“As an organon, logic is the supreme tool necessary for all other sciences. It is the necessary condition for science even to be possible. This is because logic is essential to intelligible discourse. That which is illogical is unintelligible; it is not only not understood, but is also incapable of being understood. That which is illogical represents chaos, not cosmos. And absolute chaos cannot be known in an orderly way, making knowledge or scientia a manifest impossibility.”

 
“Aristotle understood that, to escape the illogical morass of infinite regress, the ultimate cause of motion must be an uncaused cause or an unmoved mover. Actuality must precede potentiality, just as being must precede becoming. Therefore being precedes becoming by logical necessity. This forms the classical root for the notion that “God” is a logically necessary being, an ens necessarium. Later philosophical theology would add that God is necessary not only logically but also ontologically. That is, pure being has its power of being within itself. It is self-existent and cannot not be.”
“The concept of divine revelation was central to Augustine’s epistemology, or theory of knowledge. He saw that revelation is the necessary condition for all knowledge. As Plato argued that to escape the shadows on the cave wall the prisoner must see things in the light of day, so Augustine argued that the light of divine revelation is necessary for knowledge.”

“Faith, says Augustine, is an essential ingredient of knowledge. Augustine does not restrict his notion of faith to what we typically refer to as religious faith. Faith also involves a provisional belief in things before we can validate them through demonstration. He adopted the famous motto Credo ut intelligam, “I believe in order to understand.”

The Quotable Round-Up #78

tpn6bjcHello! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring quotes from the book “The Art of Turning” by Kevin DeYoung. And as always if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“When we first do something we know we should not, we feel that twinge of conscience. We feel pain in our extremities like we do when we are outside in the cold. Yet if we persist in doing what is foolish, there comes a time when we start to feel better about engaging in such behavior. We no longer consider that it is wrong. The bad stuff doesn’t feel so bad anymore, which is when we are in great spiritual peril. This is the danger of having a seared conscience.”

“Are you kicking against the goads? Are you grieving the Holy Spirit? What is your conscience telling you? Is the Holy Spirit pleading with you to see what you have refused to see? When conscience accuses us of wrong, let us turn from the sin with all haste.”

“If we walk around feeling all the time like we are a failure as a Christian, a failure as a parent, and a failure as a pastor, we have not grasped the gift of the gospel. This is not what it means to have the ministry of the Holy Spirit in our life.”

“A conscience is not only indispensable to living a life pleasing to God and enjoying peace with God; it is essential for living as the human beings God made us to be.” 

“There is a close connection between the work of the Holy Spirit and the operation of the conscience. John Flavel, a Puritan clergyman and author, observed that the conscience “is God’s spy, and man’s overseer.” 

“When the Holy Spirit shines a light on what is bad (or good) in us, it is then the role of the conscience to appropriate the work of the Spirit (John 3:20–21).”

“The Holy Spirit works in tandem with the conscience to produce in us a life of godliness and peace.”

The Quotable Round-Up #77

tpn6bjcHello guys! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring fresh quotes from Mark Jones latest book “A Christian’s Pocket Guide to Good Works and Rewards” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“We find no stingy God in the Scriptures who keeps the heavens shut and refuses to bless his people. No, if he will ‘tear open’ the heavens and send his Son to die for our sins, ‘how will he not also with him graciously give us all things?’ (Rom. 8:32).”

“The fruit of the Spirit is love. To possess him entails possessing love. We therefore obey as loving creatures with hearts changed by the Spirit of Christ. In light of this, one fundamental point needs to be clearly made: God accepts and rewards our works not because of any intrinsic merit in ourselves, but because our good works are performed by the power of the Holy Spirit. As a result, for God to reject our good Spirit-wrought deeds, he would not only be rejecting us, but also himself.”

“We can never lose when we put God first, even if the immediate consequences may be painful or difficult. This is our hope: that living by faith out of love for God, he will one day reward us for those times we put him first, in situations where even our allegiance to God was tested.”

“Faith, hope, and love are theological virtues that make up the Christian life. It has been said that faith and hope may be exercised with regards to personal advantage, but love always has someone else’s benefit in view, whether God or neighbor. God loves to reward love.”
“The Father who gave two gifts to us, the Son and the Spirit, will look upon us as justified in Christ and sanctified in him by the Spirit. Our Heavenly Father will be well pleased with his work. He will accept us for Christ’s sake and reward and vindicate us because of his Spirit, who enabled us to do good works and prepared us for them in advance (Eph. 2:10).”
“Heaven will be a family of people who are in every way a treasured possession, not only to Christ, but also to us. Do we, in our evangelism, tell people we want to spend eternity with them in heaven.”
“A Christian’s standing before God is not based on their works, but a Christian performs good works to demonstrate their standing in Christ. Obedience doesn’t make one a Christian, but proves one to be a Christian.”

The Quotable Round-Up #76

tpn6bjcHowdy  to all! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring a mix bag of quotes from Mark Jones “A Christian’s Pocket Guide to Good Works and Rewards”, Tony Reinke’s “12 Ways Your Phone is Changing You”, and Al Mohler’s “The Prayer that Turns the World Upside Down” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the books at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“The fruit of the Spirit is love. To possess him entails possessing love. We therefore obey as loving creatures with hearts changed by the Spirit of Christ. In light of this, one fundamental point needs to be clearly made: God accepts and rewards our works not because of any intrinsic merit in ourselves, but because our good works are performed by the power of the Holy Spirit. As a result, for God to reject our good Spirit-wrought deeds, he would not only be rejecting us, but also himself.” — Mark Jones “A Christian’s Pocket Guide to Good Works and Rewards”

“We find no stingy God in the Scriptures who keeps the heavens shut and refuses to bless his people. No, if he will ‘tear open’ the heavens and send his Son to die for our sins, ‘how will he not also with him graciously give us all things?’ (Rom. 8:32).” — Mark Jones “A Christian’s Pocket Guide to Good Works and Rewards”

“If we understand that our Father knows our needs before we ask him, we won’t feel compelled to try to impress God with our prayers and elicit a certain response through some sort of feigned earnestness. Instead, by faith we will see a sovereign God who is ready and able to answer our prayers, and who directs all things for our good and his glory.” –Al Mohler “The Prayer that Turns the World Upside Down” 

“Prayer is not persuasion. Prayer is about God’s will being done—not our own. We must come to God and learn to pray “your will be done” just as Jesus did. If God’s will is truly perfect, then why would we want to persuade him to do something that is less than perfect? It is true that Scripture encourages us to bring our deepest concerns, anxieties, and needs before God—the Bible, in fact, is full of illustrations portraying as much—but we must not bring our needs to God thinking that we do so to break down a wall of hostility or complacency. We must bring our needs before God humbly, willing to submit to his perfect plan.”–Al Mohler “The Prayer that Turns the World Upside Down” 

“Prayer is never an isolated event. When we pray, we convey our entire theological system. Our theology is never so clearly displayed before our own eyes and before the world as in our prayers. Praying forces us to articulate our doctrines, convictions, and theological assumptions.” –Al Mohler “The Prayer that Turns the World Upside Down” 

Technology even in the most evil hands of man is not outside God’s ruling hands.” –Tony Reinke “12 Ways Your Phone is Changing You”

“The presence of the Holy Spirit in us, as he enables us to do good works, plays an important role in whether God accepts and rewards the good works of believers. The Spirit enables us to do good works in accordance with the commandments of God. We do not simply obey “externally” but also “internally” due to a changed heart. Thus, the root of love must be present in all of our good works. otherwise, they fail to be good.” — Mark Jones “A Christian’s Pocket Guide to Good Works and Rewards”

 

 

The Digital Round-Up #15

zkorsnzHello there! Here’s “The Digital Round-Up” to give you some of my favorite freebies, articles and everything in between. What do you think of it? Eclectic? Weird? Interesting? I just want to know. So please, please, please do me a favor and post your comments about this post at the comment section. Thank you and God bless!

FREE “Wordsearch Starter” Bible software – this free Bible software (plus 10 free ebooks) promise that this software is not shallow and has ample detailed tools to study the Bible.

FREE “Calvin on the Christian Life” by Michael Horton – free download just by signing the brief survey.

Four Crucial Questions Raised by Black Panther– As Black Panther movie breaks the box office, it also raises some important questions about race, identity and justice. Read this short but great article that tackles some grounds the movie has covered.

What Does “World” Mean in John 3: 16? – Did Jesus die for all or only to the elect? What does John 3: 16 really say.

How to Read the Bible Well: An Introduction to Biblical Hermeneutics – David Qaoud gives us steps on how to make much of the Scriptures.

9 Questions Interesting People Ask to Cut to the Small Talk– this set of questions are straight forward and thought provoking that will really help you get to know the person you are talking to.

500+ Preaching Resources – This couldn’t wait for the Freebie Edition and some of the links here are not free so I’ll leave this huge list by David Murray.

New Words Added to Oxford English Dictionary- Again! – Let Grammar Girl, Mignon Fogarty tells you the latest words plus why dictionaries add words often.

25 Great Calvin and Hobbes Strips – I recently got interested in reading this popular comic strip by Bill Watterson. Im planning to buy books collecting these strips. Will you help me out?

Voddie Baucham warns the latest trend in Christianity