The Quotable Round-Up #92

f11jjqtHeads up guys! time for some 6 awesome quotes from a Christian book. This time we shall enjoy quotes from the book “Church History 101” by Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke and Michael A. G. Haykin. If you find these nuggets of wisdom superb, please get the book at your favorite bookstore or log in to Amazon. God bless and Peace!

The martyr Ignatius of Antioch tied together the ways in which the church responded to both persecution and false teaching when he said, “If Christ be not fully human and if he did not really die, why am I suffering for the gospel and prepared to die for it?” — Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers

“Though Constantine did much to help the church, he ultimately hindered it by blurring the distinction between a citizen of this world and a citizen of the world to come.” — Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #nicene

“An early fourth-century church leader named Arius claimed that Jesus was really a being created by God the Father (Arianism), saying, “There was a time when the Son was not.” But the New Testament teaches that Christ is both the Son of God and the Son of Man. If He were not so, He could not reconcile us to God and bring us into God’s presence.” –Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #arius #deityofchrist

“Augustine’s theological legacy can scarcely be exaggerated. Reformed Christians are especially indebted to him; Calvinism is sometimes called Augustinianism. He was a great and influential Christian thinker, yet had it not been for the influence of his mentor, Ambrose; the prayer life of his mother, Monica; and the convicting words of Scripture, we might never have known of him.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #augustine

“To refute Pelagianism, Augustine had to expound the great Pauline doctrines of grace, such as original sin, fallen man’s total depravity and inability to save himself, the efficacy of the atoning death of Christ, and the necessity of faith in Him for salvation. The enormous biblical learning and perseverance of Augustine won the day against Pelagius’s teaching in the church.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #augustine

“Today’s world is not much different from that of the tenth century. The church continues to be confronted with paganism, as well as with temptations to worldly success. While some denounce the tenth century as “the Dark Ages,” we must recognize that our contemporary society demonstrates a moral and spiritual darkness, and the church is challenged to respond with the light of the gospel.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #darkage

“While differing on church polity, the Puritans—who included such notables as William Perkins, Matthew Henry, John Owen, Thomas Goodwin, John Bunyan, John Flavel, and Thomas Watson—were united by a concern to maintain faithful preaching of the gospel and teach sound doctrine; to promote true conversion, personal faith, and practical godliness; and to bring God’s Word to bear on all aspects of life, as individuals, in families, and in the nation at large.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #puritans

The Quotable Round-Up #91

f11jjqtHeads up guys! time for some 6 awesome quotes from a Christian book. This time we shall enjoy quotes from the book “Is Christianity Good for the World?” by Christopher Hitchens and Douglas Wilson. If you find these nuggets of wisdom superb, please get the book at your favorite bookstore or log in to Amazon. God bless and Peace!

“If there is no God, what is truth? Christopher Hitchens displays great moral indignation, but, given atheism, I want him to justify that indignation. If there is no God, then who cares? And Christopher Hitchens writes as a very capable wordsmith, but given atheism, I want him to justify his vibrant and engaging prose. If there is no God, then yammer, yamber, yaw&^% . .” — Douglas Wilson/Christopher Hitchens

“There is no God, right? Because there is no God, this means that—you know—genocides just happen, like earthquakes and eclipses. It is all matter in motion, and these things happen.”– Douglas Wilson/Christopher Hitchens

“The Christian faith is good for the world because it provides the fixed standard which atheism cannot provide and because it provides forgiveness for sins, which atheism cannot provide either. We need the direction of the standard because we are confused sinners. We need the forgiveness because we are guilty sinners. Atheism not only keeps the guilt, but it also keeps the confusion.”– Douglas Wilson/Christopher Hitchens

“If Christianity is bad for the world, atheists can’t consistently point this out, having no fixed way of defining “bad.” If Christianity is good for the world, atheists should not be asked about it either because they have no way of defining “good.”– Douglas Wilson/Christopher Hitchens

“In the kindness of God, the Cross is an object of inexorable fascination to us. When men and women look to Him in His death, they come to life in His resurrection. And that is good for the world.” — Douglas Wilson/Christopher Hitchens

“The Cross is God’s merciful provision that executes autonomous pride and exalts humility.” — Douglas Wilson/Christopher Hitchens

 

The Quotable Round-Up #89

f11jjqtHowdy! It’s a great day to sit down, chill and sip your favorite drink! And while at it, add some awesomeness in your day by reading our latest collection of quotes.  This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the books “Know the Creeds and Councils” by Justin Holcomb and “The Potter’s Freedom” by James R. White. And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the books at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“A catechism is a book or document giving a brief summary of the basic principles of Christianity in Q&A form. Catechisms represent the practical, “on-the-ground” application of the main teaching agreed upon at church councils and expressed through creeds and confessions. The word “catechism” comes from the Greek word katechein, which means “to teach” or “to instruct.” Catechisms are basic outlines of the teachings of the Christian faith, set forth in a way that those unfamiliar with doctrine can easily understand.” — Justin Holcomb

“Because creeds are bare-bones structures (the outlines of the sketch), it makes sense that the earliest statements of the church are creeds, while later statements of particular denominations are confessions. Creeds distinguish orthodoxy from heresy (or Christian faith from non-Christian faith). Confessions distinguish denominational distinctives (or one type of Christian faith from another type of Christian faith.” — Justin Holcomb

“Creeds aren’t dogmas that are imposed on Scripture but are themselves drawn from the Bible and provide a touchstone to the faith for Christians of all times and places.”– Justin Holcomb

“Christians of the past were no less concerned with being faithful to God than we are, and they sought to fit together all that Scripture has to say about the mysteries of Christianity — the incarnation, the Trinity, predestination, and more — with all the intellectual power of their times. To ignore these insights is to attempt to reinvent the wheel, and to risk reinventing it badly.”
— Justin S. Holcomb

“Grace is a wonderful word that speaks of God’s freedom and God’s power. I cannot earn grace, merit grace, purchase grace, or force grace. It is free or it is not grace. Yet the grace of God that brings His elect safely into eternal rest is not merely some persuasive power that may or may not accomplish the ends for which God intends it. Grace is no servant of man, dependent upon the creature for its success. No, saving grace is God’s own power. Saved, and kept, by grace. That is the Christian’s hope.” –James R. White

“Arminians teach that God sends his grace to “persuade” men to believe, but they deny that God can actually raise a man to spiritual life without his assistance and agreement. They deny that there is an elect people, based solely on the choice of God, to whom God will infallibly apply the benefits of Christ’s atonement. Grace is limited to being effective on the “willing,” i.e., it is submitted to the power and will of man and his decisions. It becomes a mere “wooing” force. The Reformed Christian who has sought to share the gospel of grace with Roman Catholics recognizes that this is the same view of grace found in the Roman communion, and it is deeply troubling to find it expressed within what is called Protestantism.” –James R. White

“The question is, Who, ultimately, is responsible for my union with Jesus Christ? God is both the one who is the origin and source of salvation in general, and the one who powerfully, purposefully, and perfectly draws His elect people into blessed union with Jesus Christ.” –James R. White

 

The Digital Round-Up # 22

myptv2kHey folks! Prepare for another round of the “The Digital Round-Up” as we serve you interesting articles, freebies and videos. And if you’re enjoying this stuff, please do tell us on the comment section. So buckle up and enjoy the thrill.

FREE “Psalm 139” by Charles Spurgeon – an excerpt from the Treasury of David also by Spurgeon,  its send the message to readers of God’s intent to overthrow the power of darkness and shows the sovereign God over evil.

Heidelberg Catechism in Tagalog – I never knew that this beloved catechism has a Tagalog version. I read it and it pierced my heart.

Smart phones and Reading Habits – Make sure on what we are scrolling on a screen is healthy to our minds and not just scrolling us to our deaths.

Two extremes to be avoided in preaching –  Not gonna spoil to you what are the two extremes but this is a great article.

25 Things God said to the church – The church through out the centuries shows her flaws and all however God still loves the church and here’s what He said about it.

Top Five Logical Fallacies in the Social Justice Movement – Knowing these false logical arguments we can see the factual than the emotional zeal of the movement.

Seeking Revelation in Bourdain’s Parts Unknown –  The beauty of diversity Anthony Bourdain discovered are appetizers for something more in God’s plan of redemption.

 

 

The Quotable Round-Up #88

f11jjqtHowdy! It’s a great day to sit down, chill and sip your favorite drink! And while at it, add some awesomeness in your day by reading our latest collection of quotes.  This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the book “Know the Creeds and Councils” by Justin Holcomb. And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“We are born in sin. We are naturally enemies of God and lovers of evil. We needed to be made alive (regenerated) so that we could even have faith in Christ. All of this is grace that we don’t deserve. Because we didn’t earn or attain this grace, we cannot lose it. God graciously preserves us and keeps us. When we are faithless toward him, he is still faithful.”

“We can stand before God only by his grace as he mercifully attributes to us the righteousness of Jesus Christ and attributes to him the consequences of our sins, which were judged on the cross. Declaring sinners righteous based on the work of Christ is called the doctrine of “imputed righteousness” — God declares a believer to be good, and even though the believer is not good in reality, this declaration is all that matters.”

“In Augustine’s scheme, grace is not a divine nudge but a power that frees people to love God for who he really is. It is this God-empowered love that destroys the rule of sin and bestows the ability to choose to sin or to choose not to sin (posse non peccare — “able not to sin”). However, until this grace is given, people cannot choose goodness. Though we might be in the grip of an evil power that we do not understand, we are still responsible for spending our time and energy on the things that we do wrong.”

“The Christian faith is not only a matter of the heart, an exercise in sentimentality, for “Christian faith is a matter of the mind as well as the heart and the will, and as thinking persons we must give intellectual expression to our faith.” Still it does not demand blind acceptance to empty propositions. It is concerned with the direction of our souls.”

The Definition of Chalcedon described Christ’s descent as a true incarnation of the Logos, the Second Person of the Trinity, while denying that a man was converted into God or that God was converted into a man. There was no confusion or absorption between the divine nature and the human nature of Christ; the two remained distinct. Similarly, the incarnation was not merely a divine indwelling of a human nor a connection between two persons. Instead, Chalcedon asserted that there was a real union between the divine and human natures that existed in one personal life: the life of Jesus of Nazareth, who was the eternal Logos.”

“If Christianity had agreed with Arius that Jesus could be a lesser god — if it had failed to defend monotheism, if it had fallen into the trench of professing three unrelated deities — it may have dissolved into the religion of Rome and its pantheons of false gods. If the early Christians had lost their nerve and conceded the “lesser divinity” of Jesus, whatever that might mean, then the work of God in Christ for our salvation would have been rendered meaningless. No mere man, nor half god, could possibly intervene to save fallen and sinful humanity, let alone restore all of creation. Only the Creator can enter creation to fix its brokenness and redeem its original, latent purpose.”

“The Nicene Creed is perhaps the most famous and influential creed in the history of the church, because it settled the question of how Christians can worship one God and also claim that this God is three persons. It was the first creed to obtain universal authority in the church, and it improved the language of the Apostles’ Creed by including more specific statements about the divinity of Christ and the Holy Spirit.”

The Quotable Round-Up #87

tpn6bjcHowdy! It’s a great day to sit down, chill and sip your favorite drink! And while at it, add some awesomeness in your day by reading our latest collection of quotes.  This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the book “The Potter’s Freedom” by James R. White. And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“The religions of men, Roman Catholicism, and Arminianism, all share one thing in common: the deep desire to maintain the ability of man to control the work of God in salvation and always have the “final say.” The blunt assertion of Christ refutes this error. The fact is, outside of the divine action of drawing the elect to Christ none would come to Him. It is beyond the capacity of the fallen man.”

“All men would be left in the hopeless position of “unable to come” unless God acts, and He does by drawing men unto Christ. Outside of this divine enablement no man can come to Christ. No man can “will” to come to Christ outside of this divine drawing.”

“Why is one man raised to eternal life and another left to eternal destruction? The Scriptures offer an answer that is satisfying to the believer, but insufficient for the person unwilling to trust in God’s goodness. What is the basis of God’s act of predestination? It is “according to the kind intention of His will.” Each word is important. It is His will, not our will. And remember, this is speaking not of some general plan to “save” so that it is God who “initiates” but man who actuates. This is the specific predestination of individuals to sonship. The basis of this specific decree is God’s will. No mention is found of man’s will.”

“Synergism is the hallmark of man’s religions: monergism the mark of the biblical gospel.”

“When the Scriptures say that men are spiritually dead, we are not to understand this to mean that they are spiritually inactive. Men are active in their rebellion, active in their suppression of the truth, active in their sin. Instead, spiritual death refers to alienation from God, the destruction of the positive, active desire to do what is right in God’s sight, and most importantly, the ability to do what is good and holy.”

“Reformed theologians insist that for one to be free as a creature then one must have first and foremost a sovereign Creator. God is the free and sovereign Creator and acts freely in that realm that is His: we are mere creatures, never sovereign, never autonomous (i.e., without law, without a superior authority), but responsible within the realm of our createdness.”

“The Christian heart is glad to confess, “Salvation is of the Lord.” All of it. In completeness. In perfection. The God who decrees all things saves perfectly. Salvation is a divine act, a divine work. It is centered upon God, not upon man. It is God’s glory, not man’s, that is at stake. The God-centeredness of the gospel is what makes the biblical teaching so fundamentally different than all the religions of men.”

7 Short But Excellent Christian Books I Have Read

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(This article was previously posted at Top Christian Books (TCB Media). This is the short version of it.) 

Forget those thick and bulky books that you consider an essential read for Christians. Here are short, 100 pages less but excellent books that you should read. Also I included links to “The Quota ble Round-Up” that features awesome quotes from these books.

1.) “Apologetics Made Simple” by Jason L. Petersen – Petersen presents 5 keys on which apologetics in this straight forward book. If the word “apologetics scares you, let this brief book bare the essentials that is easy to remember and easy to apply.   (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

2.) “A Primer on Free Will” by John Gerstner – A short book but an excellent treatment of free will. John Gerstner doesn’t just bombard us with biblical jargons and verses but started this book by giving a great illustration that will really stoke you out. If you want to grasp free will this book is an excellent one. (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

3.) “A Christian’s Pocket Guide to Good Works and Rewards” by Mark Jones – Mark Jones sets out the biblical view on good works and rewards which is sometimes sets confusion among Christians who don’t want to fall into legalism and antinomianism. (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

4.)  “Church History for Modern Ministry” by Dayton Hartman – Is church history relevant to our modern day ministry? How will it help our Christian living or apologetics from people, places and events that are so detached to our times? This book will help you understand the importance of knowing our history.

5.) “Transgender” by Vaughn Roberts – A brief introduction on a very controversial subject. Vaughn Roberts delivers  important points enough for a Christian to consider this issue.

6.) “Discerning Truth” by Jason Lisle – This maybe a companion book to “Ultimate Proof of Creation” but it’s a great read and a standalone too. Much of the debate between atheist and Christians specifically on the origins, are sometimes based on faulty logical statements. Dr. Lisle list out logical fallacies and how can a Christian these statements in this short but powerful book. (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

7.)  “Why Bother with Church?” by Sam Allberry – Church life is essential to the believer as part of his spiritual growth. Sam Allberry gives a believer reasons why church is important in this short but great book by answering common questions Christians always ask. (Here are  some selected quotes from this book)

Do you have your own list of favorite short books? Please share it on the comment section.

 

The Quotable Round-Up #84

tpn6bjcHowdy! It’s a great day to sit down, chill and sip your favorite drink! And while at it, add some awesomeness in your day by reading our latest collection of quotes.  This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the book “What’s Your Worldview?” by James N. Anderson. And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“Indeed, one of the toughest challenges Atheist worldviews face is explaining how anything can be objectively good or bad if there’s no God to serve as the ultimate standard of goodness. The same goes for objective meaning and purpose: if there’s no God, then it seems that the universe can have no ultimate meaning, purpose, or direction. The universe just is what it is and does what it does; there’s really no good or bad about it, objectively speaking.”

“Unpopular though the idea may be today, the Bible teaches the polar opposite of Pelagianism: we are born in a sinful and spiritually dead state, unable to live good moral lives apart from divine grace. Indeed, Jesus himself preached the shocking idea that heaven is for immoral people who admit that they’re bad and cry out for God’s mercy and forgiveness rather than for moral people who think they’re good enough to deserve it.”

“In effect, Skeptics want us to believe that they alone have discerned some universal truth about human knowledge, namely, that there isn’t any human knowledge. But do they claim to know that? If they do, they’re not being consistently skeptical; specifically, they’re not being skeptical about their own claim to know a universal truth. On the other hand, if they say they don’t know that Skepticism is correct, why should we take their position seriously? By their own profession, their opinions about human knowledge are no better than anyone else’s.”

“There’s no way to be a consistent Relativist. Just consider the basic claim of Relativism: “There is no objective truth.” Is that claim itself supposed to be objectively true? If so, it obviously contradicts itself! But if the basic claim of Relativism isn’t objectively true, Relativism seems to forfeit any right to be universally accepted or meaningfully debated.”

“On closer examination, Pluralism turns out to be just as “exclusive” and “intolerant” as many traditional religions, if not more so, simply because it cannot accommodate any religion that rejects its distinctive perspective on religion. If Pluralism is right, other religions must be quite wrong. So much for “live and let live”! By excluding non-Pluralist religions, Pluralism exposes itself as just one more religious viewpoint in competition with all the others.”

“Your worldview represents your most fundamental beliefs and assumptions about the universe you inhabit. It reflects how you would answer all the “big questions” of human existence, the fundamental questions we ask about life, the universe, and everything.”

 

The Quotable Round-Up #82

tpn6bjcHello guys! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring fresh quotes from Theron St. John’s book titled “Something More” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at Lulu.com.

“Inquiring about identity is an essential element in finding one’s purpose.” — Theron St. John, “Something More” #theronstjohn #somethingmore #purpose #satisfaction #meaning #joy

“Understanding the purpose, or aim of life, will enable one to endure the ups and downs of life.” — Theron St. John, “Something More” #theronstjohn #somethingmore #purpose #satisfaction #meaning #joy

“When someone can identify who they are at the core of their being, when they realize their purpose for life, and when this search for purpose couples with the pursuit of joy, the hoped-for result is to find satisfaction.”– Theron St. John, “Something More” #theronstjohn #somethingmore #purpose #satisfaction #meaning #joy

“Maybe the reason our relationships, possessions, and achievements fail to provide us with purpose and fulfill us with satisfaction is not because we are searching for what cannot be found. Maybe the issue is not in the objects in and of themselves. Maybe the vanity of our search stems from our ruling desires and expectations. In other words, the problem is not that we are looking for happiness. The problem is that we are looking for happiness in all the wrong places. We settle for lesser things.” — Theron St. John, “Something More” #theronstjohn #somethingmore #purpose #satisfaction #meaning #joy

“We can only unearth the root problem in our pursuit when we discover how far we’ve drifted from the grand and glorious purpose for our lives.” — Theron St. John, “Something More” #theronstjohn #somethingmore #purpose #satisfaction #meaning #joy

The Quotable Round-Up #80

tpn6bjcHello guys! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring fresh quotes from Chris Bruno’s book titled “The Whole Story of the Bible in 16 Verses” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“The way we think about God shapes the way we think about everything else, along with the way we act and respond to every circumstance.”

“When he had finished making everything, God looked at it all and saw that it was “very good.” Notice that God was the One who pronounced the verdict. The entire universe came to be because he spoke, and he was the only one qualified to evaluate his creative work. We don’t see the angels coming alongside God to give him some encouraging feedback. (In fact, we don’t even know when and how God created the angels, though we can be pretty sure they started praising him right away.) No, the focus at the very beginning is on God, his creation, and his authority over that creation.”

“Don’t tell the guys at Trinity Broadcasting Network, but financial prosperity is not the primary indicator of God’s blessing. Think back to the garden. What was the greatest blessing that God gave to Adam and Eve? The greatest blessing was living in God’s very presence, knowing him, and worshiping him.”

“God redeemed his people from slavery in Egypt by means of a substitute. Very early in the Bible, then, the patterns of redemption are established. In the first Passover, we see the pattern that God established in the law. The entire Mosaic covenant points forward to the need for a greater sacrifice. It points us to the promised seed.”

“Jesus, as the anointed King, the Messiah, would succeed where Adam had failed. Even though Adam was the image of God, he did not rule God’s kingdom as he should have. Neither did any of the kings in Israel or Judah. But finally here was One who would do what no other king could do. He would act as God’s representative Ruler, the true King. But in order to establish his perfect reign, he would have to be the representative servant of God, which meant he would have to suffer on behalf of God’s people.

“We saw in Isaiah 53 that the final substitute for the sins of God’s people could not be a lamb. No, it had to be one of them. It had to be the Promised One, who would represent the people and stand in as their substitute. It shouldn’t surprise us to hear Jesus say that his mission was not “to be served but to serve.” His main task as a servant was “to give his life as a ransom for many” (Mark 10:45). When he said that, he was pointing back to Isaiah 53:11–12. He was the servant.”