Category Archives: Books

The Quotable Round-Up #68

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On this edition of “The Quotable Round-Up”, we commemorate the 500th year of the Reformation. The following quotes are from the book “A Little Book on the Reformation” by Nathan Busenitz. What’s cool is that you can get the book for free just by following this link: https://www.tms.edu/reformation-ebook-giveaway/. But before you download the book, enjoy some snippets from the book:

“Fueled by their study of the Bible, the Reformers proclaimed the truth that salvation is not based on good works. Rather, it is the free gift of God, given to undeserving sinners by grace alone (sola gratia) through faith alone (sola de), on the basis of the nished work of Christ alone (solus Christus). Recognizing that believers can take no credit for their salvation, the Reformers responded to the wonder of redemption by giv ing God all of the glory. Soli Deo gloria summarizes the triumphant cry of sinners who recognize they are saved solely by grace.”

“The Reformers contended that, because Christ is the Head of the church, His Word is the final authority for the church. Papal decrees and church traditions must be subjected to the authority of Scripture alone (sola Scriptura), not the other way around. is commitment to biblical authority led the Reformers to boldly denounce the works-based sacra mental system of medieval Catholicism, recognizing that the true gospel ran contrary to the so-called gospel of the Roman church.”

“Why did Catholic authorities at the Council of Constance condemn John Huss as a heretic? Why did they deem him worthy of death? e answer to those questions revolves around the issue of authority. Based on his study of Scripture, Huss boldly proclaimed that Christ alone is the head of the church, not the pope.”

“It was ignorance of Scripture that made the Reformation necessary. It was the recovery of Scripture that made the Reformation possible. And it was the power of the Scripture that gave the Reformation its enduring impact, as the Holy Spirit brought the truth of His Word to bear on the hearts and minds of individual sinners, transforming them, regenerating them, and giving them eternal life.”

“Tyndale lived at a time when those who dared to translate the Word of God, and thereby unchain it from its Latin coffin, faced the possibility of being burned alive. But the seeds of Protestantism, im planted in English soil a century-and-a-half earlier by John Wycliffe, had come to sprout green shoots that gave fruit in the form of Tyndale’s Bible. For his efforts, the gifted linguist would suffer greatly for the sake of Christ, being thrown into a dungeon and put on trial for his life.”

“There is no part of our life, and no action so minute, that it ought not to be directed to the glory of God.” Those words, penned by John Calvin in his commentary on 1 Corinthians, aptly summarize the life and ministry of this notable Reformer. For Calvin, soli Deo gloria was more than a slogan. It was the primary goal of his life.”

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Book Review: Why We’re Protestant by Nate Pickowicz

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u6zfemtWhen writing reviews, there are lots of thing you can say about a thick book. This is because a bulky volume can cover lots of grounds in a given topic. However in this new book of Nathan Pickowicz it’s not just an introduction to the 5 Solas we affirm. But it’s a mix bag of everything for everyone’s need done in a clear, understandable and orderly manner.  This book is for a.) A believer who is confused with what he believes b.) A Catholic who wants to know the difference doctrinally between a Protestant and Roman Catholic church c.) A believer who wants to know the historic background of the 5 solas d.) A believer who wants a concise biblical response to Roman Catholicism’s beliefs and e.) A seeker who wants to know how to get right with God. That’s why I love reading this short book of because every angle is covered to satisfy different readers.

Reading this as we celebrate the 500th of the Reformation will reinforce the biblical and historical belief that we hold as a Christian. And it’s a gentle reminder for us that we should not compromise what believe. I highly recommend this book.

My verdict:

5 out of 5

The Digital Round-Up #3

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aslvob2Howdy partners! I bring you the new and improved “The Digital Round-Up”. This curated post will featured my personal picks. This is a random collection favorite article, freebies, quotable from my social media, videos and anything I find interesting. So I hope you enjoy this post and if you have something I want to feature on this post, please feel free to comment below.

Good Boy – Some of you might not know that I’m a fan of Batman specifically his comicbooks. I posted this I think a year ago. It’s a short story written by Tom King about a dog named Ace that Batman adopted. It’s a great story and it won an award. So go check it out at this link.

Batman Gallery at Pinterest – Since I’m at it with the Caped Crusader, I would like to share to you my Pinterest board on some of the awesome artworks on Batman. I hope you like it

Greek Primer ebook – just by subscribing to Exegetical Tools newsletter you get a free copy of this very useful ebook. Also don’t forget to enter your e-mail to receive 5 advanced lessons on Greek which is also free.

Throwback Post– In case you missed this two part study of Song of Solomon posted 2015, I hope you take time reading it:

6 Ways to Fall in Love With Christ Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3.

How to Spot Fake News 

The Quotable Round-Up # 67

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Hey people here’s your favorite post. Hot and fresh quotes from the book “Why We’re Protestant” by Nate Pickowicz . If you enjoyed these quotes, please buy the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon. Feel free to share this post over your social media. God bless you and enjoy your week!

“One of the most common practices of Catholics is to entreat the help of saints who have passed on, in hopes of obtaining grace through the benefits of their extra works. However, if we understand that “none are righteous” (Rom. 3:10; cf. Isa. 64:6), and the only righteousness available to the believer is the imputed righteousness of Christ, then all the “merit” possessed by the saints of church history is not their own; it all belongs to Christ, because the good deeds done are done in Christ (Eph. 2:10; cf. 1 Cor. 6:19-20).”

“The distinguishing mark of Martin Luther’s theology was what he called “the theology of the cross.” In short, it was a biblical worldview built on the notion that all of life, all of theology, all of existence, all of our knowledge of God, and all of salvation must be viewed through Christ’s work on the cross. Similarly, the apostle Paul declared, “For I determined to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ, and Him crucified ” (1 Cor. 2:2).”

“Christians are those who are declared righteous by God, although they are not righteous themselves. “Sins remain in us, and God hates them very much,” said Luther. “Because of them it is necessary for us to have the imputation of righ teousness, which comes to us on account of Christ, who is given to us and grasped by our faith.” It is an astounding reality, and it is all of grace.”

“But people say, “That ’s not fair!” or “I don’t like that God chooses who will be saved”—as if it impugns the character of God. Erasmus used to say, “Let God be good.” But Luther replied, “Let God be God!” This doctrine is not from men, otherwise we could mutiny against it. Rather, it’s from the Lord.”

The heart of the battle over sola Scriptura is a battle over the issue of authority. Who has the right to tell people what to believe and what to do? If the Bible is inspired by God, and thereby, inerrant, then it is also authoritative. In other words, the revealed commands of God in Scripture are binding on the believer. When Scripture speaks, God speaks.”

“What was the message of the Reformation? In essence, the main question asked and answered was: How does a person get right with God? This was the central issue. For Rome, sinners are saved by faithfully adhering to the dogma of the Catholic Church. But when the Reformers began to examine the Bible, they saw that salvation came by God Himself through the gospel of Jesus Christ.”

 

Book Review: Life is Short: Enjoy Mo Ang Buhay by William B. Girao

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hhqprb4 Written in Taglish this book explores four lessons on living wisely in this fleeting world. Ptr. Girao digs the book of Ecclesiastes and unearthed valuable gems out of that dark book of the Bible.  If you have heard preachers giving messages from Ecclesiastes, so of it is gloom and doom. Not that it’s like Revelations but Ecclesiastes expose the life that is a dead end street which sometimes forget.   We rather go to Psalms and Proverbs to find nuggets of wisdom for living that matters.  Yet Ptr. Girao made much of this part of the Bible to lead us on what it means to have a meaningful life.

“Life is Short: Enjoy Mo Ang Buhay “is a brief book for you enjoy and share to friends.  Ptr. Girao wrote something short but indelible to the heart. Short but definitely shake you to the reality of life.  The book ends with a sinner’s prayer which I totally disagree in presenting the gospel. For me its anti climatic for a book that is well written.  Other than that the book is a great read.

My verdict: 4.5 out of 5

Buy the book online: https://tinyurl.com/yb8ufy3b

The Quotable Round-Up # 66

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Hey people here’s your favorite post. Hot and fresh quotes from the books “Preach: Theology Meets Practice” by  Mark Dever and Greg Gilbert;  and “ The KJV Only Controversy ” by James R. White . If you enjoyed these quotes, please buy the books at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon. Feel free to share this post over your social media. God bless you and enjoy your week!
“Conspiratorial thinking tends to see the “facts” in such a way as to always support one’s preconceived notions. Once a person has accepted the idea that the “modern versions” are somehow in league with one another to “get” the KJV and to “hide” God’s truths, every instance of variation between the KJV and those versions is filled with great importance. Rather than examining the facts and gaining a proper perspective on the issue, KJV Only advocates find in the most innocent scribal error a grand scheme to rob Christ of His deity or deny that salvation is by grace through faith.”

“Modern translations of the Bible as a matter of standard practice Greek include textual footnotes to indicate to the reader uhere the or Hebrew manuscripts contain variants. KJV Only advocates, generally, dislike such footnotes, feeling that they can “confuse” the reader, and that they are, in fact, faith-destroying. If a version dares to note that a word, phrase, or verse is questionable, it will be accused of “attacking” the Word of God by those who defme the KJV as the Word of God. Unfortunately, many defenders of the AV seem to be unaware of the fact, noted previously,” that the King James Version contained 8, 422 such marginal readings and notes when it was first published. A High quality printings of the King James to this day, such as those printed at Cambridge, contain these references, though many printed in America omit these items.”

“God has indeed the KJV, for which we can all be very thankful. And I do not doubt for a second that He will continue to
bless those who read it and obey it. But God blessed the Septuagint,
too. And the Vulgate. And translations in dozens of different languages as well. God has blessed the NASB, and the NIV and many others. God blesses those who seek His will and follow it. Those who fmd His will in the NIV are just as blessed as those who find it in the KJV. Limiting God’s blessing to a particular translation of the Bible is historically untenable and spiritually dangerous.” 

“The KJV was not the first English translation, nor the last. Hence, it is perfectly logical to ask, “Why should I use it as the standard by which I am to test all others?” Yet the reason, almost always, is found in the equation, “The King James Bible Alone = the Word of God Alone.” That’s the starting point, the foundation of the entire system.”

“The King James Only controversy, by its very nature, brings
disruption and contention right into the pews of the local Christian
church. KJV Only advocates, due to the nature of their beliefs, are often disruptive of the fellowship in churches, feeling that their message of “God’s one true Bible” needs to be heard by all. Anyone who does not “know what they know” needs to be told quickly, and 
most often, forcefully. And since much of the KJV Only material
alleges grand and complex conspiracies on the part of the modem
translations, distrust of others who use (or would even defend) those translations often results in schisms within the fellowship and a debilitation of the local body.”

“The Holy Spirit uses the preached word to give spiritual life to those who are spiritually dead, and He uses the preached word to conform God’s people more closely to the image of Jesus. As preachers of the Word, we should have no less confidence in it than God Himself does. When we preach we should do so with the full conviction that God will accomplish His purposes through His Word. It will not return to Him empty.” — Mark Dever and Greg Gilbert

“Scripture is useful for doctrinal instruction, both positively and negatively, and it is useful for ethical instruction, again both positively and negatively. Taken together, all that provides a pretty comprehensive map of what is required to edify a church and build Christians up in Christ.” — Mark Dever and Greg Gilbert

Book Review: Can A Christian Be A Nationalist? By Dr. Isabelo F. Magalit

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hhqprb4It seems to me when we talk about nationalism, we as a Filipino Christians sometimes can’t point our finger on it. We might see it on how blind nationalist cults like Iglesia ni Cristo, Ang Dating Daan or a Filipino church like Aglipayan built a religious group that is Pinoy. Some might not look far than to see how Ed Lapiz promotes it or the recently the resurgence of an evangelical movement that promotes the social gospel coined as “neighborology”.  But what does the Bible really says Christians being a nationalist?

The book “Can A Christian Be A Nationalist?” answers it with a resounding “Yes”. Dr. Magalit who wrote some books on sticky issues like homosexuality and family planning, tackles a topic that some of us are confused of. We know we are heaven’s citizen and pilgrims just passing through but do we care to promote nationalism? Dr. Magalit first answers the case against being nationalist which is for me impressive. Then he sites Paul and Moses as examples. He included a sort of survey and ends with his vision for the nation.

The book is definitely short and you might say its “bitin”. For a topic about nationalism there is much to be said. Then again this book is enough for Christians to open further discussion and do some actions.  This book is superbly done and a must read.

My verdict: 4.5 out of 5