The Quotable Round-Up #105

WmUyJhsIt’s another year of reading books! I hope you’ll pick up one and start reading it. Even better, why not have a book reading challenge this year?  That will be a lot of fun (and challenge too).  I think Goodreads it’s a good site to do your reading challenge as it monitors your progress and share your accomplishment to everyone online. Better check that website. Anyways, here’s some quotes from the book by Bryan Litfin Getting to Know the Church Fathers: An Evangelical Introduction. Buy his book by clicking this link.

“The pastor who expounds the Word of God before his people holds an awesome power within his mouth. His words can be a source of golden treasure.”

“When asked which of his students should succeed him in his professorship of rhetoric, Libanius replied, “It ought to have been John, had not the Christians stolen him from us.” John Chrysostom must have been a great communicator to have impressed his pagan teacher so much. Yet to Libanius’s dismay, John used his speaking skills for the name of Jesus Christ.”

“Athanasius possessed a profound understanding of the incarnation of Jesus Christ. The whole question of the Son’s divinity was not some intellectual premise that could fit into a logical syllogism, as it was for many of the Arians. Rather, it mattered deeply to Athanasius because it was a question of Christian salvation. For Athanasius, salvation meant much more than individually “getting saved” so as to escape hell or get to heaven. His theology centered on the relationship between the created world and the Uncreated God.”

“The views of Arius began to receive imperial favor and were accepted by many bishops across the empire. Athanasius seemed to stand alone against a world that had gone completely Arian. His challenge was far more difficult in this new age of Imperial Christianity. Now he faced not only his theological opponents, but the all-powerful Roman emperors whose politics were tied to theology.”

“For several decades Athanasius was a lonely defender of the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity against the Arian view. Only at the end of his life did his efforts begin to pay off as Arianism was finally rejected.”

“Interpretation in the ancient church was a spiritual quest, so everything depended on your heart for the Lord. Godliness was required for true comprehension, not just a good mind. The lifestyle of the interpreter genuinely mattered.”

“Perpetua is revealed to be a godly Christian woman—one who affirmed the high calling of being a daughter and mother, yet who put her loyalty to Jesus Christ before even those worthy vocations. Because of her close walk with the Lord, she became a spiritual leader of her band of confessors. The towering respect she earned among her jailed companions was based on the depth of her spiritual life. Her piety lent her a reverence and authority not normally accorded to women in Roman society.”

 

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