8 Favorite Quotes From the Book “Rooted” by Edward Rhodes

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Hey happy Monday and belated Happy Father’s Day to all dads reading this. We had a blast yesterday as we celebrate the Lord’s Day and Father’s Day. All the dads in our church was recognized and were given some gifts.  We are so thankful for the church who annual recognized the dads and to God for giving us an opportunity to be a father and a husband.

Anyways, here are 8 favorite quotes from Edward Rhodes book Rooted, published by 10 Publishing. If you like these quotes, please get yourself a copy of this book by clicking to 10 Publishing or Amazon link.

‘Justification through faith alone’ became the watchword of the Reformation and the teaching which most set Protestants (as they became known) apart from Catholics.”

“Christian belief doesn’t involve sidelining your brain, as some allege, but instead can involve hard thinking, especially about matters which are controversial or cause disunity.”

“Grace is not simply God’s pardon but also God’s power and God’s presence.”

“Athanasius writes that God himself, not wanting humanity to perish, has himself become a human being in Jesus Christ, in order to reunite us with God and thus with eternal life.”

“The church is first and foremost a worshipping community. If then we want to understand the early church, it makes sense for us to pause for a while and take a look at their worship.”

“Being thoroughly rooted in the past helps us, I believe, to stand stronger in the present, to know who we are and what we are about, even in the midst of great change.”

“For the early church, becoming a Christian meant starting to live a totally new life, no longer focused on yourself but centred on serving God and others.”

“If God is essentially unselfish love, if God loves us so much as to become one of us and suffer for our sakes, then what sort of people should we be? What sort of love for God and for other people should we have?”

The Quotable Round-Up #105

WmUyJhsIt’s another year of reading books! I hope you’ll pick up one and start reading it. Even better, why not have a book reading challenge this year?  That will be a lot of fun (and challenge too).  I think Goodreads it’s a good site to do your reading challenge as it monitors your progress and share your accomplishment to everyone online. Better check that website. Anyways, here’s some quotes from the book by Bryan Litfin Getting to Know the Church Fathers: An Evangelical Introduction. Buy his book by clicking this link.

“The pastor who expounds the Word of God before his people holds an awesome power within his mouth. His words can be a source of golden treasure.”

“When asked which of his students should succeed him in his professorship of rhetoric, Libanius replied, “It ought to have been John, had not the Christians stolen him from us.” John Chrysostom must have been a great communicator to have impressed his pagan teacher so much. Yet to Libanius’s dismay, John used his speaking skills for the name of Jesus Christ.”

“Athanasius possessed a profound understanding of the incarnation of Jesus Christ. The whole question of the Son’s divinity was not some intellectual premise that could fit into a logical syllogism, as it was for many of the Arians. Rather, it mattered deeply to Athanasius because it was a question of Christian salvation. For Athanasius, salvation meant much more than individually “getting saved” so as to escape hell or get to heaven. His theology centered on the relationship between the created world and the Uncreated God.”

“The views of Arius began to receive imperial favor and were accepted by many bishops across the empire. Athanasius seemed to stand alone against a world that had gone completely Arian. His challenge was far more difficult in this new age of Imperial Christianity. Now he faced not only his theological opponents, but the all-powerful Roman emperors whose politics were tied to theology.”

“For several decades Athanasius was a lonely defender of the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity against the Arian view. Only at the end of his life did his efforts begin to pay off as Arianism was finally rejected.”

“Interpretation in the ancient church was a spiritual quest, so everything depended on your heart for the Lord. Godliness was required for true comprehension, not just a good mind. The lifestyle of the interpreter genuinely mattered.”

“Perpetua is revealed to be a godly Christian woman—one who affirmed the high calling of being a daughter and mother, yet who put her loyalty to Jesus Christ before even those worthy vocations. Because of her close walk with the Lord, she became a spiritual leader of her band of confessors. The towering respect she earned among her jailed companions was based on the depth of her spiritual life. Her piety lent her a reverence and authority not normally accorded to women in Roman society.”

 

The Freebie Round-Up #24

z8GyXA7It’s two weeks to go and its Christmas day! All of us are busy and I know some of you are stressed out. We had our 2nd wedding anniversary yesterday and we had a movie date (the usual things me and my wife do). Also please pray for I will speak at a youth fellowship this Wednesday. May God’s Word touch the hearts of our church youth group. Anyways, its freebie time and I hope you’ll enjoy these free stuff!

FREE “Cornerstone Worship” mp3 and chord charts –  From Tim Chester  church these music are download ready for your music ministry. Some are written by Tim Chester himself.

FREE all digital downloads of “Church History” – A perfect gift from Credo Courses. You can download the digital video, audio, PDF workbook and keynote/power point of of their “Church History” Boot Camp. This freebie is one day only so grab it now.

FREE New Philosophy Course by e-mail –  Sign up with this brand new course from 1517 Academy and you’ll learn about philosophy through the Christian lens.

FREE e-books on Counseling Ministry – Biblical Counseling Centers offers free 5 e-books that can help your church establish a counseling ministry. Would You Be a Good Counselor?, 5 Practical Worksheets, 5 Mistake Church Makes, 5 Things Church Needs and 4 Reasons Why Lay Counseling is Effective can be a valuable resource for believers who want to counsel.

FREE downloadable guide “Devotions for Christmas” – A free guide meditating on the Incarnation of Jesus, Fuller De Pree Center offers this freebie for this coming holiday.

FREE “You Are Exalted” EP by Hope Goodin – Another music freebie that you shouldn’t miss is this EP from Cross to Crown Ministries. It’s their first venture into the world of music recording and they hope all will enjoy their music.

FREE e-book “Answers to Pastors FAQs” by Warren W. Wiersbe – a comprehensive book loaded with advice from pastor to a pastor. David C. Cook offers this by signing up through e-mail.

7 Awesome Ways to Learn Church History Online for Free


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Uruguayan journalist Eduardo Galeano once said “History never really says goodbye. History says, ‘See you later.’ Well it depends on what history we want to welcome. Its either mistakes or victories of the past that will be knocking at our doors.  However we can anticipate the comeback when we look at history. Christians should study church history. Here’s 7 ways to learn church history without breaking the bank. Of course, nothing can beat having a seminary training about church history and I highly encourage you to do so. However, for those who can’t go to a seminary or even buy a book in church history, this list can be a good place to know about this important subject:

1. Get church history daily/weekly in your inbox – Christian History Institute offers a daily  It Happened Today sort of a”this day in history” thing simply by subscribing to their e-mail list (scroll down to the bottom till you find the subscribe box.)

Christianity.com offers an e-mail newsletter which you can choose on either daily or weekly church history. Click here to subscribe and scroll down to click the church history newsletter offer.

Also you can check out Christianity Today’s Church History which gives you free weekly e-mails simply by subscribing.

2. Listen to a podcast – Aside from the cool Cranberries intro, this weekly podcast on church history hosted by Dr. Stephen Nichols takes a slice of church history and discusses how God works to events, people and places and how it’s relevant to our time. 5 Minutes of Church History is non technical in approach and because it’s brief, you can easily tuck it to your podcast listening list.

Another podcast that is like Dr. Stephen Nichols is Christian History Almanac. Presented by 1571, this daily podcast is 5 minutes hosted by Dr. Dan van Voorhis. Aside from the stories, every episode ends with a cool prose and poetry.

However, if you want a more lengthy (15 minutes or so), go check Today in Church His-Story It’s a weekly peek to the halls of history hosted by Dr. Andrew Smith. If you head to their website you’ll see past episodes that will invigorate your knowledge about church history.

For kids who wants to learn about important figures of church history, they can check out a podcast from Rebel Alliance Media. Click here for the latest episode of Fathers of Faith for Covenant Kids.

     Now for some hardcore stuff….

3. Watch lectures over Youtube – Ryan Reeves church history lectures are superb. If you check his Youtube channel, you’ll see his 64 k subscribers and some of his 20-30 minute videos had been viewed 500 k times. Very impressive. His videos consist of pictures and notes for viewers to catch the important words, names and events. The audio and images are great. Ryan Reeves  Historical Theology for Everyone is a must watch!

If you want, however, to see an actual lecture, you can also check Dr. Nathan Buzenitz Historical Theology and Carl E. Trueman’s lectures on The Reformation both presented in The Master’s Seminary.

Lastly, this seminar series by Berean Baptist Church of Queensland is a must watch if you want to know about Baptist History.

4. Listen to a Sunday School series – Tommy Nelson of Denton Bible Church, gives a series simply titled Church History, in engaging and exciting way, considering the dread of studying historical stuff.  The audio quality is good and you can feel the churchy setting to were this series is given.

Moving to Sermon Audio, I would like to recommend two Sunday School series that tackles church history. First is from Brian Borgman,pastor of Grace Community Church Nevada, A Survey of Church History . Love the audio quality and how Borgman articulate the teachings which are not intimidating. Last one is from Dr. James White Church History Series .  If you know James White, his debates and podcast, you’ll find this at par from what he dishes out. The audio quality is not that good but if you like what you hear and like White you’ll gonna stick around for this series.

5. Download a Seminary app – Reformed Theological Seminary has an app that you can download in various app stores for free. The lecturer is Dr. S. Donald Fortson and you can access these lectures on i-Tunes U from your i-phone and i-Pad.

6. Sign up on an online seminary level course – You can check out audio lectures of Ancient and Mediaval History and Reformation and Modern History courses at Covenant Theological Seminary. You have to create an account to access it complete with downloadable MP3, transcript and study guides. You can check other seminaries that has church history courses by clicking here.

7. Dowload e-books on Church History – If your’re not into the audio and video lectures, you can download free e-books on church history. A simple search on Mogernism.com yields some books that you can check out.

So thats my list, so what’s yours? Kindly comment in the comment section on what should be added on the list. By the way, I would like to thank Dead Men Community, TCB Family and the Baptist Review Facebook Groups for giving me some of what has been included on the list. It really helped me to write this article and gave me ways to self-study Church History.

Collecting the Past: Delighting Grace Interviews Caleb of Log College Press

joanna-kosinska-44214-unsplash-01While Monergism.org dishes out awesome e-books of the past Christian giants, there is a new kid on the block that is solely dedicated in publishing unknown 18th-19th century American Presbyterians. As you go to their website Log College Press,  you’ll find over 1700 works by 350 authors that are free for download. So we reached out to Caleb Cangelosi, founder of Log College Press, to talk about church history, old books and of course Log College Press:

Delighting Grace:  First off, why is it important for us to look back and read materials of and about the past? In other words, how essential is history for a believer?

Caleb Cangelosi: The study of church history is vital for Christians today because we are not the first ones to study the Scriptures, wrestle with theological questions, and engage in apologetics and evangelism. God has been working in His church far before He brought us into the world. We stand on the shoulders of those who have gone before us, and have much to learn from our forefathers in the faith. As George Santayana wrote, “Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” 

The study of history also teaches us that God uses sinful saints to accomplish His purposes, and therefore gives us great hope and encouragement as we go forth into the world today. Additionally, we must recognize that our religious experience in American has been impacted by our American theological ancestors – the past is not dead. At Log College Press, we are committed to encouraging the reading of both primary and secondary sources, for it is important to hear directly from those in the past, and to understand their writings in proper historical context, so that we might rightly apply their teachings to the present. We are motivated by the conviction that as Christians in the present root themselves in the past, we will bear fruit forward into the future for the glory of God and the church of Jesus Christ.

Delighting Grace:  Can you tell us who are these authors and what is the most important contribution by this group in Christianity specifically in America?

Caleb Cangelosi: Log College Press is devoted to collecting and reprinting the writings of and about American Presbyterians from the 18th and 19th centuries. Our website contains authors from several different American Presbyterian denominations, and each of these bodies made unique contributions to the church of Jesus Christ, so it is difficult to state just one important thing they gave to America. But in general, in the books on our site you will find a commitment to the Scriptures as the inerrent, authoritative word of God; a commitment to the Westminster Standards as the summary of Scriptural teaching; a commitment to a gospel-centered and law-delighting piety; an emphasis upon the church of Jesus Christ; a focus on missions, evangelism, and apologetics; and a love for preaching (many of the writings on our site are sermon collections).

Delighting Grace:  There are already tons of Christian books out there that a Christian read. What do you think makes reading old stuff a unique experience for a Christian?

Caleb Cangelosi: C. S. Lewis put it best in his essay, “On the Reading of Old Books.” He wrote, “Every age has its own outlook. It is specially good at seeing certain truths and specially liable to make certain mistakes. We all, therefore, need the books that will correct the characteristic mistakes of our own period. And that means the old books…The only palliative [to ignoring our cultural and chronological blind spots] is to keep the clean sea breeze of the centuries blowing through our minds, and this can be done only by reading old books. Not, of course, that there is any magic about the past. People were no cleverer then than they are now; they made as many mistakes as we. But not the same mistakes. They will not flatter us in the errors we are already committing; and their own errors, being now open and palpable, will not endanger us. Two heads are better than one, not because either is infallible, but because they are unlikely to go wrong in the same direction.”

Delighting Grace:  Wow! Please tell us how Log College Press started and what goals LCP wants to target?

Caleb Cangelosi: For some time I have had the desire to create a website that collected all the digitized writings of early American Presbyterians, much as the Post-Reformation Digital Library did for the Post-Reformation period. Over the past several years I have also wanted to see some of the books and booklets that I appreciate from these authors reprinted. After not finding any publishers interested in doing these reprints, I finally decided I would try to do it myself. I quickly realized that I could kill two birds with one stone and combine my two desires into one project – Log College Press (the name is taken from the earliest American Presbyterian “seminary,” William Tennent’s Log College – as many universities and colleges have a publishing arm, I thought it a fitting name on several levels).

So Log College Press is really two things. It is a website, offering free PDF downloads of all the public domain writings we can find online (or digitize ourselves) from 18th and 19th century American Presbyterians, and a near-daily blog that discusses the authors and writings we’re putting on our site. It is also a publishing company that aims slowly but surely to reprint some of the hidden gems from these authors, and hopefully one day secondary sources about them (we also have on our website a bookstore that possibly contains one of the largest online collections of secondary sources on American Presbyterian history). The website and the publishing are both designed to bring these authors and their writings back to the knowledge of the general public, so that by taking root in the past we might bear fruit into the future.

Delighting Grace:  And some are free to download and read!

Caleb Cangelosi: Yes! We want people to be able to read the writings of this period, and so the primary service we provide is collecting in one place what is already out there on the internet. Nearly all the books on our site have been found on Google Books or Archive.org. The digitization projects of these websites is a tremendous blessing of the internet age. What formerly was hidden away in a library is now accessible with the click of a button, and can be loaded onto a tablet for easy access. We’ve done the work of locating the books and organizing them by author, so that those who are interested in this period can discover them more easily. Hopefully our work will enable these authors to reach a new audience – including an international audience who has never heard of these writings, or does not have American library access to them. I like to say that our job is that of “biblio-paleontology” – the finding of ancient books by unknown authors, who though dead can still speak God’s truth to our hearts.

Delighting Grace:  That’s one noble cause for Christians to bring these authors back. How about the process of getting these materials and putting it online. It must be interesting process, isn’t?

Caleb Cangelosi: It is indeed. Currently two of us (a gentleman named Andrew Myers, and I) work on posting books to the site. As I just mentioned, we typically locate the works we are looking for on Google Books or Archive.org. Discovering books – especially books we had not known of previously – is the best part of this work. Sometimes we have to manually scan a work ourselves, or pay a library to do that for us. Since all these works are in the public domain, it is not a legal problem to copy them and post them online.  We also clean up the PDFs, deleting blank pages to make them more visually attractive and “user-friendly.” We try to find as many pictures of the authors as we can find. That has also been a neat part of this work, because often there is only one picture that everyone thinks of with regard to a particular author – and yet there are often more pictures online, some from the authors’ youth. Seeing additional pictures can help change the way you think about a person.
Delighting Grace:  Is there a one material from LCP that has a unique backstory?

Caleb Cangelosi: Two items come immediately to mind. First, Archibald Alexander’s Lecture Notes on Systematic Theology. Not only do we see what seminary class was like back in 1818, but also the notes were taken by Charles Hodge, Alexander’s student who followed Alexander as professor at Princeton Seminary. It is not alway easy to make out his handwriting, but it is fascinating to read hand-written notes from this era. Second, Alfred Nevin’s Encyclopedia of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. This is a treasure trove of historical and biographical information, pictures, and Biblical-theological studies on important topics.

Delighting Grace:  Now that’s a gem! If a Christian wants to read books from Log College Press, which one would you first recommend and why?

Caleb Cangelosi: Of the four publications that we have put out thus far, William Swan Plumer’s Christ All in All: The Right Temper for the Theologian that would be appealing to the broadest audience. Plumer’s booklet, though originally addressed to seminary students, is an easy introduction to the writing of the period, and is so rich in its Christ-centered piety. It is also a great read for anyone who desires to study theology, for Plumer teaches the manner in which one ought to approach this joyful task.

If any of your readers are pastors or teachers, they should definitely buy Francis Grimke’s Meditations on Preaching (about the glorious calling of feeding God’s sheep with the truth of Christ), or C. W. Grafton’s A Forty-Three Year Pastorate in a Country Church (about small-town ministry). Finally, if anyone is interested in learning more about Presbyterianism, Thomas Dwight Witherspoon’s The Five Points of Presbyterianism is a great introduction. We are about to publish Archibald Alexander’s Aging in Grace: Letters to Those in the Autum of Life (about the trials of growing old, and the Christian’s hope beyond the grave).

Delighting Grace:  How about those freebies? What is your Top 5 must read from the Free PDF Library?

Caleb Cangelosi: This is a very difficult question, as we currently have on our site over 1750 works by over 350 authors! But here are five that I would recommend:

  1. Archibald Alexander’s Biographical Sketches of the Founder, and Principal Alumni, of the Log College – to learn more about the history of the Log College and early American Presbyterianism.

 

  1. William Catto’s A Semi-Centenary Discourse – A History of the the First African Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, and a Brief Notice of Rev. John Gloucester – to learn about early African-American Presbyterians.

 

  1. Henry Alexander White’s Southern Presbyterian Leaders– biographical sketches of Presbyterians in the 19th century Southern United States.

 

  1. William Swan Plumer’s Commentary on the Psalms (or Hebrews orRomans)– commentaries filled with exegetical insights and practical wisdom for the Christian life.

 

  1. Stuart Robinson’s Discourses on Redemption– a great study of the gospel from Genesis through Revelation; a 19th century Biblical theology.

 

Delighting Grace:  Thank you for this interview Caleb, so please invite our readers to go check Log College Press and share us your social media accounts so we can get in touch with LCP.

Caleb Cangelosi: Thank you so much for the privilege of communicating to your readers what we are doing! We would love for them all to visit our site (www.logcollegepress.com) and browse our free library, our blog archives, and our bookstore. We are giving away a free ebook on our home page, so your readers should definitely take advantage of that (currently, it’s William Swan Plumer’s Christ All in All: The Right Temper for a Theologian). Your readers can also sign up to receive our blog posts in their email inbox (this is a great way to learn more about the authors and works on our site). We are also on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. To keep the website going, and to enable us to reprint more works, please buy our publications! I don’t currently ship to the Philippines, but I do sell ebooks (in Kindle and EPUB formats), so international readers can purchase them. We also sell our books on Amazon. If anyone has more questions, there is a contact form on our website. We would love to hear from them!

The Quotable Round-Up #88

f11jjqtHowdy! It’s a great day to sit down, chill and sip your favorite drink! And while at it, add some awesomeness in your day by reading our latest collection of quotes.  This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the book “Know the Creeds and Councils” by Justin Holcomb. And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“We are born in sin. We are naturally enemies of God and lovers of evil. We needed to be made alive (regenerated) so that we could even have faith in Christ. All of this is grace that we don’t deserve. Because we didn’t earn or attain this grace, we cannot lose it. God graciously preserves us and keeps us. When we are faithless toward him, he is still faithful.”

“We can stand before God only by his grace as he mercifully attributes to us the righteousness of Jesus Christ and attributes to him the consequences of our sins, which were judged on the cross. Declaring sinners righteous based on the work of Christ is called the doctrine of “imputed righteousness” — God declares a believer to be good, and even though the believer is not good in reality, this declaration is all that matters.”

“In Augustine’s scheme, grace is not a divine nudge but a power that frees people to love God for who he really is. It is this God-empowered love that destroys the rule of sin and bestows the ability to choose to sin or to choose not to sin (posse non peccare — “able not to sin”). However, until this grace is given, people cannot choose goodness. Though we might be in the grip of an evil power that we do not understand, we are still responsible for spending our time and energy on the things that we do wrong.”

“The Christian faith is not only a matter of the heart, an exercise in sentimentality, for “Christian faith is a matter of the mind as well as the heart and the will, and as thinking persons we must give intellectual expression to our faith.” Still it does not demand blind acceptance to empty propositions. It is concerned with the direction of our souls.”

The Definition of Chalcedon described Christ’s descent as a true incarnation of the Logos, the Second Person of the Trinity, while denying that a man was converted into God or that God was converted into a man. There was no confusion or absorption between the divine nature and the human nature of Christ; the two remained distinct. Similarly, the incarnation was not merely a divine indwelling of a human nor a connection between two persons. Instead, Chalcedon asserted that there was a real union between the divine and human natures that existed in one personal life: the life of Jesus of Nazareth, who was the eternal Logos.”

“If Christianity had agreed with Arius that Jesus could be a lesser god — if it had failed to defend monotheism, if it had fallen into the trench of professing three unrelated deities — it may have dissolved into the religion of Rome and its pantheons of false gods. If the early Christians had lost their nerve and conceded the “lesser divinity” of Jesus, whatever that might mean, then the work of God in Christ for our salvation would have been rendered meaningless. No mere man, nor half god, could possibly intervene to save fallen and sinful humanity, let alone restore all of creation. Only the Creator can enter creation to fix its brokenness and redeem its original, latent purpose.”

“The Nicene Creed is perhaps the most famous and influential creed in the history of the church, because it settled the question of how Christians can worship one God and also claim that this God is three persons. It was the first creed to obtain universal authority in the church, and it improved the language of the Apostles’ Creed by including more specific statements about the divinity of Christ and the Holy Spirit.”

Book Review: The Portable Seminary by David Horton (Editor)

Reference book is not my turf in reviewing books, but “The Portable Seminary” blows me away. Not too bulky of a book, this book packs definitive entries that a true seminary carries.

Some contents here reminds me of “Fast Facts…” apologetics book. Enough information to let you grasp the topic but leaves room for you to crave for more. It gives you an overview of what a seminary teaches without giving all of it away. “The Portable Seminary” is not too technical to read that you might think scholars who live in ivory towers can appreciate. An average Christian joe will like this book. The word “seminary” on the title doesn’t equate as being too boring to read. Nor does it mean it will be a complicated smorgasbord of information you need to digest. Catalogue neatly in one volume, this one will not overwhelm you.  In fact I enjoy this book like any other book I read.

With “The Portable Seminary” you can take the seminary anywhere. It is a very useful reference tool for people who want to get much needed information in one book. This book is user-friendly for everyone. One of the best gift you can give to a seminary students and church workers. But for me, you owe to yourself to have a copy of this essential material to equip you. This wont collect dust on your book shelf. Highly recommended!