The Quotable Round-Up #105

WmUyJhsIt’s another year of reading books! I hope you’ll pick up one and start reading it. Even better, why not have a book reading challenge this year?  That will be a lot of fun (and challenge too).  I think Goodreads it’s a good site to do your reading challenge as it monitors your progress and share your accomplishment to everyone online. Better check that website. Anyways, here’s some quotes from the book by Bryan Litfin Getting to Know the Church Fathers: An Evangelical Introduction. Buy his book by clicking this link.

“The pastor who expounds the Word of God before his people holds an awesome power within his mouth. His words can be a source of golden treasure.”

“When asked which of his students should succeed him in his professorship of rhetoric, Libanius replied, “It ought to have been John, had not the Christians stolen him from us.” John Chrysostom must have been a great communicator to have impressed his pagan teacher so much. Yet to Libanius’s dismay, John used his speaking skills for the name of Jesus Christ.”

“Athanasius possessed a profound understanding of the incarnation of Jesus Christ. The whole question of the Son’s divinity was not some intellectual premise that could fit into a logical syllogism, as it was for many of the Arians. Rather, it mattered deeply to Athanasius because it was a question of Christian salvation. For Athanasius, salvation meant much more than individually “getting saved” so as to escape hell or get to heaven. His theology centered on the relationship between the created world and the Uncreated God.”

“The views of Arius began to receive imperial favor and were accepted by many bishops across the empire. Athanasius seemed to stand alone against a world that had gone completely Arian. His challenge was far more difficult in this new age of Imperial Christianity. Now he faced not only his theological opponents, but the all-powerful Roman emperors whose politics were tied to theology.”

“For several decades Athanasius was a lonely defender of the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity against the Arian view. Only at the end of his life did his efforts begin to pay off as Arianism was finally rejected.”

“Interpretation in the ancient church was a spiritual quest, so everything depended on your heart for the Lord. Godliness was required for true comprehension, not just a good mind. The lifestyle of the interpreter genuinely mattered.”

“Perpetua is revealed to be a godly Christian woman—one who affirmed the high calling of being a daughter and mother, yet who put her loyalty to Jesus Christ before even those worthy vocations. Because of her close walk with the Lord, she became a spiritual leader of her band of confessors. The towering respect she earned among her jailed companions was based on the depth of her spiritual life. Her piety lent her a reverence and authority not normally accorded to women in Roman society.”

 

The Quotable Round-Up #92

f11jjqtHeads up guys! time for some 6 awesome quotes from a Christian book. This time we shall enjoy quotes from the book “Church History 101” by Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke and Michael A. G. Haykin. If you find these nuggets of wisdom superb, please get the book at your favorite bookstore or log in to Amazon. God bless and Peace!

The martyr Ignatius of Antioch tied together the ways in which the church responded to both persecution and false teaching when he said, “If Christ be not fully human and if he did not really die, why am I suffering for the gospel and prepared to die for it?” — Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers

“Though Constantine did much to help the church, he ultimately hindered it by blurring the distinction between a citizen of this world and a citizen of the world to come.” — Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #nicene

“An early fourth-century church leader named Arius claimed that Jesus was really a being created by God the Father (Arianism), saying, “There was a time when the Son was not.” But the New Testament teaches that Christ is both the Son of God and the Son of Man. If He were not so, He could not reconcile us to God and bring us into God’s presence.” –Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #arius #deityofchrist

“Augustine’s theological legacy can scarcely be exaggerated. Reformed Christians are especially indebted to him; Calvinism is sometimes called Augustinianism. He was a great and influential Christian thinker, yet had it not been for the influence of his mentor, Ambrose; the prayer life of his mother, Monica; and the convicting words of Scripture, we might never have known of him.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #augustine

“To refute Pelagianism, Augustine had to expound the great Pauline doctrines of grace, such as original sin, fallen man’s total depravity and inability to save himself, the efficacy of the atoning death of Christ, and the necessity of faith in Him for salvation. The enormous biblical learning and perseverance of Augustine won the day against Pelagius’s teaching in the church.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #augustine

“Today’s world is not much different from that of the tenth century. The church continues to be confronted with paganism, as well as with temptations to worldly success. While some denounce the tenth century as “the Dark Ages,” we must recognize that our contemporary society demonstrates a moral and spiritual darkness, and the church is challenged to respond with the light of the gospel.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #darkage

“While differing on church polity, the Puritans—who included such notables as William Perkins, Matthew Henry, John Owen, Thomas Goodwin, John Bunyan, John Flavel, and Thomas Watson—were united by a concern to maintain faithful preaching of the gospel and teach sound doctrine; to promote true conversion, personal faith, and practical godliness; and to bring God’s Word to bear on all aspects of life, as individuals, in families, and in the nation at large.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #puritans

The Quotable Round-Up # 79

tpn6bjcHello guys! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring fresh quotes from R. C. Sproul’s “The Consequence of Ideas” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“Philosophy was born in the ancient quest for ultimate reality, the reality that transcends the proximate and commonplace and that defines and explains the data of everyday experience.”

“For Heraclitus the process of change is not chaotic but is orchestrated by “God.” I put God in quotes because for Heraclitus “God” is not a personal being but more like an impersonal force. Flux is the product of a universal reason Heraclitus calls the logos. Here we see the philosophical roots of the logos concept that the apostle John appropriated to define the preexistent and eternal person of the Godhead who became incarnate. It would be a serious mistake, however, simply to equate or identify John’s use of logos with that of Greek philosophy, because John filled the term with Hebrew categories of thought. At the same time it would be an equally serious mistake to separate completely John’s use of the term from Greek thought.”

“The true philosopher cannot be satisfied with empirical or sensory knowledge, which is not ideal knowledge but the shadowy knowledge of opinion—the “knowledge” of the cave. The true philosopher reaches for the essence of things, for the ideals. This allows the philosopher to rise above the superficiality of Sophism and the skepticism of the materialists. He seeks the universal and is dissatisfied with a list of particulars. After discerning that a particular object is beautiful or virtuous, he moves beyond that particular to discover the very essence of beauty and virtue.”

“As an organon, logic is the supreme tool necessary for all other sciences. It is the necessary condition for science even to be possible. This is because logic is essential to intelligible discourse. That which is illogical is unintelligible; it is not only not understood, but is also incapable of being understood. That which is illogical represents chaos, not cosmos. And absolute chaos cannot be known in an orderly way, making knowledge or scientia a manifest impossibility.”

 
“Aristotle understood that, to escape the illogical morass of infinite regress, the ultimate cause of motion must be an uncaused cause or an unmoved mover. Actuality must precede potentiality, just as being must precede becoming. Therefore being precedes becoming by logical necessity. This forms the classical root for the notion that “God” is a logically necessary being, an ens necessarium. Later philosophical theology would add that God is necessary not only logically but also ontologically. That is, pure being has its power of being within itself. It is self-existent and cannot not be.”
“The concept of divine revelation was central to Augustine’s epistemology, or theory of knowledge. He saw that revelation is the necessary condition for all knowledge. As Plato argued that to escape the shadows on the cave wall the prisoner must see things in the light of day, so Augustine argued that the light of divine revelation is necessary for knowledge.”

“Faith, says Augustine, is an essential ingredient of knowledge. Augustine does not restrict his notion of faith to what we typically refer to as religious faith. Faith also involves a provisional belief in things before we can validate them through demonstration. He adopted the famous motto Credo ut intelligam, “I believe in order to understand.”

Used Book Finds: How Great Christian Met Christ by James C. Hefley

A collection of 40 giants in Christendom by a little know author, How Great Christian Me Christ (published by Moody Press in 1973)is one of those book that has this outstanding idea for a book but didn’t have a blockbuster hit on the market. This book which I got from Booksale (and most of the books I put a title “Used Book Finds”) has the “Who-who” personalities in Christianity. Name it this book got it. You don’t believe me? Take a shot! Spurgeon is here. Augustine is here. So is Billy Graham, John Wesley, Hudson Taylor, D. L. Moody, John Newton, Billy Sunday, Harry Ironside, Justin Martyr, George Muller is here. Impressive list isn’t it?! This brief and concise collection on how they got converted in Christianity has the best and not so best in terms of how the author tells it or the conversion is not that earth shaking. Still it’s a good read. You got to give the author the credit for the effort he has done. Anyways, I hope you enjoy this post. If you have something to share about finding great books over second hand bookstores please post a comment.