8 Favorite Quotes From the Book “Rooted” by Edward Rhodes

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Hey happy Monday and belated Happy Father’s Day to all dads reading this. We had a blast yesterday as we celebrate the Lord’s Day and Father’s Day. All the dads in our church was recognized and were given some gifts.  We are so thankful for the church who annual recognized the dads and to God for giving us an opportunity to be a father and a husband.

Anyways, here are 8 favorite quotes from Edward Rhodes book Rooted, published by 10 Publishing. If you like these quotes, please get yourself a copy of this book by clicking to 10 Publishing or Amazon link.

‘Justification through faith alone’ became the watchword of the Reformation and the teaching which most set Protestants (as they became known) apart from Catholics.”

“Christian belief doesn’t involve sidelining your brain, as some allege, but instead can involve hard thinking, especially about matters which are controversial or cause disunity.”

“Grace is not simply God’s pardon but also God’s power and God’s presence.”

“Athanasius writes that God himself, not wanting humanity to perish, has himself become a human being in Jesus Christ, in order to reunite us with God and thus with eternal life.”

“The church is first and foremost a worshipping community. If then we want to understand the early church, it makes sense for us to pause for a while and take a look at their worship.”

“Being thoroughly rooted in the past helps us, I believe, to stand stronger in the present, to know who we are and what we are about, even in the midst of great change.”

“For the early church, becoming a Christian meant starting to live a totally new life, no longer focused on yourself but centred on serving God and others.”

“If God is essentially unselfish love, if God loves us so much as to become one of us and suffer for our sakes, then what sort of people should we be? What sort of love for God and for other people should we have?”

The Quotable Round-Up #105

WmUyJhsIt’s another year of reading books! I hope you’ll pick up one and start reading it. Even better, why not have a book reading challenge this year?  That will be a lot of fun (and challenge too).  I think Goodreads it’s a good site to do your reading challenge as it monitors your progress and share your accomplishment to everyone online. Better check that website. Anyways, here’s some quotes from the book by Bryan Litfin Getting to Know the Church Fathers: An Evangelical Introduction. Buy his book by clicking this link.

“The pastor who expounds the Word of God before his people holds an awesome power within his mouth. His words can be a source of golden treasure.”

“When asked which of his students should succeed him in his professorship of rhetoric, Libanius replied, “It ought to have been John, had not the Christians stolen him from us.” John Chrysostom must have been a great communicator to have impressed his pagan teacher so much. Yet to Libanius’s dismay, John used his speaking skills for the name of Jesus Christ.”

“Athanasius possessed a profound understanding of the incarnation of Jesus Christ. The whole question of the Son’s divinity was not some intellectual premise that could fit into a logical syllogism, as it was for many of the Arians. Rather, it mattered deeply to Athanasius because it was a question of Christian salvation. For Athanasius, salvation meant much more than individually “getting saved” so as to escape hell or get to heaven. His theology centered on the relationship between the created world and the Uncreated God.”

“The views of Arius began to receive imperial favor and were accepted by many bishops across the empire. Athanasius seemed to stand alone against a world that had gone completely Arian. His challenge was far more difficult in this new age of Imperial Christianity. Now he faced not only his theological opponents, but the all-powerful Roman emperors whose politics were tied to theology.”

“For several decades Athanasius was a lonely defender of the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity against the Arian view. Only at the end of his life did his efforts begin to pay off as Arianism was finally rejected.”

“Interpretation in the ancient church was a spiritual quest, so everything depended on your heart for the Lord. Godliness was required for true comprehension, not just a good mind. The lifestyle of the interpreter genuinely mattered.”

“Perpetua is revealed to be a godly Christian woman—one who affirmed the high calling of being a daughter and mother, yet who put her loyalty to Jesus Christ before even those worthy vocations. Because of her close walk with the Lord, she became a spiritual leader of her band of confessors. The towering respect she earned among her jailed companions was based on the depth of her spiritual life. Her piety lent her a reverence and authority not normally accorded to women in Roman society.”

 

The Quotable Round-Up #92

f11jjqtHeads up guys! time for some 6 awesome quotes from a Christian book. This time we shall enjoy quotes from the book “Church History 101” by Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke and Michael A. G. Haykin. If you find these nuggets of wisdom superb, please get the book at your favorite bookstore or log in to Amazon. God bless and Peace!

The martyr Ignatius of Antioch tied together the ways in which the church responded to both persecution and false teaching when he said, “If Christ be not fully human and if he did not really die, why am I suffering for the gospel and prepared to die for it?” — Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers

“Though Constantine did much to help the church, he ultimately hindered it by blurring the distinction between a citizen of this world and a citizen of the world to come.” — Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #nicene

“An early fourth-century church leader named Arius claimed that Jesus was really a being created by God the Father (Arianism), saying, “There was a time when the Son was not.” But the New Testament teaches that Christ is both the Son of God and the Son of Man. If He were not so, He could not reconcile us to God and bring us into God’s presence.” –Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #arius #deityofchrist

“Augustine’s theological legacy can scarcely be exaggerated. Reformed Christians are especially indebted to him; Calvinism is sometimes called Augustinianism. He was a great and influential Christian thinker, yet had it not been for the influence of his mentor, Ambrose; the prayer life of his mother, Monica; and the convicting words of Scripture, we might never have known of him.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #augustine

“To refute Pelagianism, Augustine had to expound the great Pauline doctrines of grace, such as original sin, fallen man’s total depravity and inability to save himself, the efficacy of the atoning death of Christ, and the necessity of faith in Him for salvation. The enormous biblical learning and perseverance of Augustine won the day against Pelagius’s teaching in the church.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #churchfathers #augustine

“Today’s world is not much different from that of the tenth century. The church continues to be confronted with paganism, as well as with temptations to worldly success. While some denounce the tenth century as “the Dark Ages,” we must recognize that our contemporary society demonstrates a moral and spiritual darkness, and the church is challenged to respond with the light of the gospel.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #darkage

“While differing on church polity, the Puritans—who included such notables as William Perkins, Matthew Henry, John Owen, Thomas Goodwin, John Bunyan, John Flavel, and Thomas Watson—were united by a concern to maintain faithful preaching of the gospel and teach sound doctrine; to promote true conversion, personal faith, and practical godliness; and to bring God’s Word to bear on all aspects of life, as individuals, in families, and in the nation at large.”–Sinclair B. Furgeson, Joel R. Beeke, Michael A. G. Haykin “Church History 101” #churchhistory #christianity #puritans

The Quotable Round-Up #69

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Photo by Nonsap Visuals on Unsplash

Hey people here’s your favorite post. Hot and fresh quotes from the book “Long Before Luther” by Nathan Busenitz . If you enjoyed these quotes, please buy the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon. Feel free to share this post over your social media. God bless you and enjoy your week!

“The church fathers speak of the sinner’s need for a righteousness that cannot be found in either his own merits or the law. Speaking of the unattainable standard of God’s perfect righteousness, Origen explains that to be justified before people is different from being justified before God. “In comparison with other people,” he writes, “one person can be deemed just if he has lived relatively free from faults; but in comparison with God, not only is a person not justified, but even as Job says, ‘But the stars are not pure before him.’” Origen explains that while we may seem pure in comparison to other people, and vice versa, we can never be pure in comparison to God, who is perfectly pure.”

“The forensic nature of justification in the patristic literature can be seen in at least two ways: through the use of law court terminology and through the contrast drawn between justification and condemnation.”

“The Reformers recognized that Jesus did not actually become a sinner on the cross; yet God punished Him as if He were a sinner so that, in Christ, believers might be treated as if they were righteous. The sins of believers were imputed to Christ at the cross so that, because He bore the punishment for those sins, His righteousness might be imputed to those who believe in Him.”

“The Reformers taught that justification occurs at the moment of salvation, which means the believer is immediately declared righteous and restored to God’s favor. Sanctification, by contrast, takes place progressively over a believer’s entire life, and results in his or her growth in personal holiness through the power of the Holy Spirit. The regenerated heart, having received new life in Christ, is able to respond in obedience. to God and grow in godliness.”

“When justification and sanctification are confused, the inevitable conclusion is that the believer’s personal holiness contributes, at least in part, to his or her right standing before God. This legalistic notion was something the Reformers passionately sought to guard against.”

“Melanchthon and Calvin give us two clear examples of a Reformation understanding of the forensic nature of justification. In the court of heaven, sinners are guilty and worthy of condemnation. Even their self-righteous works are like filthy rags in the sight of a holy God (see Isa. 64:6). Yet by grace through faith in Christ, sinners are pardoned by the heavenly Judge and declared to be righteous. Being justified, therefore, means to be acquitted of sin and accepted by God as if we were righteous, because we are clothed in the perfect righteousness of Christ.”

“Most Roman Catholics viewed justification as a formative process that involved sinners being “made righteous” over the course of their entire lives. Consequently, in the Roman Catholic view, believers contributed to their justification through the acts of penance and good works they performed. The Reformers rejected that notion, arguing instead that justification is an immediate change in the sinner’s status before God, to which believers contribute nothing. It is entirely a work of God.”

16 Crucial Questions Every Catholic Should Ask

1. What if I die today will I be in heaven?

2. Why is it that my church is the “the one true church” yet I cannot assure of heaven?

3. If the pope cannot assure spending eternity in heaven, how about me, an ordinary Catholic?

4. Why is it hard for me to ask questions regarding my faith? Do I consider it evil to ask? Am I too embarrassed? Or too confident to my church I haven’t bothered to check it out?

5. Have I read the official catechisms of my church? Have I read Bible references? Are the verses used to justify the teachings biblically sound or out of context?

6. What is the difference between veneration and worship? Can I give examples of both to give clear distinction from the two words? Does lighting candles’, kissing images, and praying to saints, kneeling to go to the altar while reciting the rosary a form of worship or veneration? Can all devotion mention be given to God and call it worship then the same devotions will be given to saints and the Virgin Mary be called veneration?
7. When I read the Bible specially the New Testament why cant I read about the popery, priest, monks, nuns, indulgences, purgatory, scapular, relics, rosary, prayers for the dead, good works, infant baptism, confession, confirmation, last rites, holy water, etc?
8. Does having been able to trace the roots of the church to the New Testament church make my religion true even if it doesn’t really resembles it? Are their any more ways to know if my church is true?

9. Are early church fathers (Augustine, Justin Martyr, Jerome, Origen, etc) reliable? The church to confirm the doctrines has used them but some of them contradict each other and contradicts some teachings.

10. Have I kept the 10 Commandments if following them will assure me of heaven? How about the other more than 500 Mosaic laws that I need to fulfill? And how about the Church’s approximately 700 dogma and teachings? Have I followed them flawlessly if I do not want to go to hell?

11. If committing sin to me is a mistake and makes me imperfect how about those things that I should have done but didn’t (sin of omission)?

12. Is Jesus my Savior or is He just my Helper to go to heaven?

13. Why is the doctrine of papal infallibility only came to be a teaching today? Does that mean from the past centuries of not having this doctrine the Catholic Church is in error and not guided by the Holy Spirit or is it just a man made teaching?

14. What does the Bible meant of adding things to the Bible and receiving a curse from it? (Rev. 22:18).

15. If I have to take all of this Catholic teaching by faith yet its contrary to the Bible what does my faith be?

16. Could I pick and choose what I want to believe in the teaching of the Catholic Church? What about those laws of the Church that condemns me if I neglect some of their teachings?

For more information check:

Answers To My Catholic Friends

Understanding Roman Catholicism

What Every Catholic Should Know

1994 Catechism of the Roman Catholic Church

Council of Trent