Book Review: Faker by Nicholas T. McDonald

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photo grabbed from The Good Book

No one wants a faker.

In this age of social media we can easily hide real selves because we want to project a better us. So we put on the mask that will not just make us feel good but rise above anyone else. Teens and young ones sometimes struggle with this issue.

Yes, the struggle is real.

“Faker” is a short but spot on book by Nick McDonald.  In the book he admits being a former faker. He tells his story of his fakery that we can easily relate to. He became prideful and looks other down behind a mask. The problem with that he needs to maintain his status quo but ends up still feeling empty.  However that’s half of the book is all about. This is not your typical pep talk, think positive or self help for teens. In its 7 chapters the book, Nick expound Luke 18: 9-14 the story of Pharisee and the tax collector. As you read this book, Nick unleashed the power of the Scripture that will hold you till the last page. “Faker” hits the root cause of our pretension: sin and provides the solution: the gospel.  Well that something considering this is a book for teens and young ones. He even discuss the word propitiation, you might think it will turn off a teen reading the book. Well it won’t. The book ends with a plea to drop the mask and come to God.

“Faker” and “Something More” by Theron St. John (which I book reviewed previously) are spot on when it comes to addressing the younger generation by its unique way of presenting the gospel that doesn’t have to be watered down. The cool book design, artwork and pop culture references which are awesome in this book really helps the lesson stick to our mind. However  those elements doesn’t   overwhelmed  “Faker” because that’s not the star of this book but the message of Luke 18 that young people badly needs to hear. Highly recommended resource to reach out young people and teens.

My verdict:

4.5 out of 5

The Quotable Round-Up #81

tpn6bjcHello guys! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring fresh quotes from R. C. Sproul’s book titled “The Truth of the Cross” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“It is a dreadful thing to fall into the hands of a holy God Who’s wrathful. But there is no wrath for those whose sins have been paid. That is what salvation is all about.”
— R. C. Sproul

“The Greek word crisis means “judgment.” And the crisis of which Jesus preached was the crisis of an impending judgment of the world, at which point God is going to pour out His wrath
against the unredeemed, the ungodly, and the impenitent. The only hope of escape from that outpouring of wrath is to be covered by the atonement of Christ.”
— R. C. Sproul

“The idea of being the Substitute in offering an atonement to satisfy the demands of God’s law for others was something Christ understood as His mission from the moment He entered this world and took upon Himself a human nature. He came from heaven as the gift of the Father for the express purpose of working out redemption as our Substitute, doing for us what we could not possibly do for ourselves.”
— R. C. Sproul

“Christ came and paid the ransom in order to secure the release of His people, who were held captive to sin. Christ gave this ransom voluntarily, that He might redeem us from our bondage and bring us to Himself as His beloved bride.”
— R. C. Sproul

“When the Bible speaks of ransom, it speaks of that ransom being paid not to a criminal but to the One Who is owed the price for redemption, the One Who is the offended party in the whole complex of sin—the Father. Jesus didn’t negotiate with Satan for our salvation. Instead, He offered Himself in payment to the Father for us. By so offering Himself, He made redemption for His people, redeeming them from captivity.”
— R. C. Sproul

“It is important that we understand that God manifests no enmity toward us. He has never broken a promise. He has never violated a covenant. He has never sworn a vow to us that He failed to pay. He has never treated a human being in this world unjustly. He has never violated us as creatures. In short, He has kept His side of the relationship perfectly. But we have violated Him. We are the ones who violate the creature-Creator relationship. By our sin, we show ourselves to be God’s enemies. Therefore, with respect to enmity, He is the injured party, the violated One.”
— R. C. Sproul

“What do we mean when we speak of God’s justice? In the ancient Jewish mind, justice was never abstract. That’s why, in the Old Testament, justice inevitably was linked with the concept of righteousness. Righteousness means doing what is right. Therefore, God’s justice has to do with His internal righteousness, His character, which defines everything He does. God never acts according to injustice. He never violates any of the standards or canons of righteousness. A simple definition of God’s justice is “His eternal, immutable commitment always to do what is right.”
— R. C. Sproul

The Quotable Round-Up #28

Here are the quotes for the week featuring the book by R. C. Sproul “What Is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics”. Enjoy and God bless!

“The remission of sins is tied to the atoning work of Christ. In the atonement both propitiation and expiation are involved. Propitiation refers to Christ’s satisfaction of God’s justice, making it “propitious” for God to forgive us. Propitiation may be seen as a vertical act of Christ directed to the Father. At the same time, Christ is an expiation for our sins, removing or carrying away from us our sins.”

“True faith is never alone. It always manifests itself in works. Works that flow out of faith, however, are in no way the ground of our justification. They contribute nothing of merit before God. The only ground or basis of our justification is the merit of Christ. Nor is faith itself a meritorious work or the ground of our justification.”

“The dispute between justification by the infusion of Christ’s righteousness and the imputation of his righteousness is no tempest in a teapot. It makes all the difference in the world whether the ground of my justification rests within me or is accomplished for me. Christ fulfilled the law for me and gained the merit necessary for my justification. This is the ground not only of my justification, but also of my assurance of salvation. If I must wait until I cooperate with the righteousness of Christ infused within me, to the degree that I become inherently righteous, I despair of ever attaining salvation. This is not gospel or “good news”; it is bad news.”

“In our justification, faith is the means by which we are linked to Christ and receive the benefits of his saving work. By faith we receive the transfer or imputation of the righteousness of Christ. Faith is not only a necessary condition, it is a sufficient condition for Christ’s righteousness to be imputed to us. Faith, true faith, is all that is required to be justified by the righteousness of Christ. Faith trusts in and lays hold of a righteousness that is not our own.”

“Forensic justification means we are declared righteous by God in a legal sense. The ground of this legal declaration is the imputation of Christ’s righteousness to our account.”

The doctrine of justification deals with what may be the deepest existential problem a human being can ever face: How can a sinner, an unjust person, ever withstand the judgment of a holy and just God?