Tag Archives: philosophy

The Quotable Round-Up #49

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paper_zpshrjhwlqwHere are some of the quotes from the book “A Little Book for New Philosophers” by Paul Copan. If you enjoy these quotes, please buy the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.  Feel free to share this post over your social media. God bless you and enjoy your week!

 

“We are more than our fluctuating inner states. We possess a will that can resolutely trust in the character and promises of a faithful God—a will that also perseveres and endures when we feel like giving up. We have an intellect to grasp the rational and practical coherence of the Christian faith.”

“Feeling that we’re not good enough (and we aren’t!) can incline us toward vainly striving to be accepted before God. Instead we should remind ourselves of the truth that acceptance before God has actually been accomplished by Christ on our behalf (Rom 15:7). In response, we should make it our ambition to be pleasing to God (2 Cor 5:9). This presupposes that God has already received us as his children. The Christian faith is a religion of gratitude. We can take further comfort from the fact that, the longer we walk with Christ, the more we realize how shot through with sin we are.”

“While many assume that all doubting is intellectual, very often it is not. When it is intellectual, the doubter should explore rational or evidential reasons for that doubt—as well as how the Christian faith addresses the deepest longings of our hearts. Many believers will experience times of doubt, but it is during the times of stability that we should explore the solid supports of our faith.”

Consider the problem of evil. Skeptics may support their negative stance toward God by pointing to many baffling evils that appear pointless. So, they infer, God couldn’t have a reason for them. But is this charge a fair one? Actually, no. For one thing, the skeptics aren’t applying their skepticism symmetrically. Their standards for theism are likely much more stringent than their standards for theological unbelief or disbelief.”

“Christian leaders and parents should give the young people entrusted to them ample room to doubt and ask honest questions in open forums and conversations around the supper table. The next generation should receive help in constructively and honestly working through these questions to strengthen their faith so they can embrace it as their own. Great harm comes when we keep our young people in a bubble in an effort to shield them from hard questions, or when we dismiss their struggles and exhort them to “pray harder,” “read the Bible” or “just believe.”

“God doesn’t rebuke saints for honest inner struggles, questions and emotions. And even amid their doubt and darkness, they may show forth God’s presence through living faithful lives. When we experience such struggles, we are in holy company.”

“In our philosophizing, we must have the courage to do at least two things: to resist false ideas in our pursuit of knowledge and to pursue philosophy in a distinctively Christian manner.”

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