The Freebie Round-Up #131

This is the day I’m picking up my in law from the hospital. She had her brain surgery last Friday. Thank you for all you prayers and financial support for my Mama.

Anyways, enjoy these freebie to start your week.

FREE webinar “Surprised by Jesus Q & A” with Dane Ortlund – In line with the new book, 10 Publishing is inviting folk join it’s online book launch on May 12 with author, Dane Ortlund. Click here to register for free.

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Pinoy Reformed Recap (September 2021)

This is that time of the month that we look back some social media highlights of Reformed/Calvinist individuals and ministries that you might have missed. These includes upcoming events, news, blog post, podcast, books and anything that is worth checking out. In case you miss out some of my post on this blog and on other website I contribute, I have that too here. See you after 30 days!

Pinoy Teolohiya –If your looking for a English-Cebuano theological blog, then click the link and enjoy this one.

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Pinoy Reformed Recap (August 2021)

This is that time of the month that we look back some social media highlights of Reformed/Calvinist individuals and ministries that you might have missed. These includes upcoming events, news, blog post, podcast, books and anything that is worth checking out. In case you miss out some of my post on this blog and on other website I contribute, I have that too here. See you after 30 days!

What is God? – His Incommunicable Attributes – Found The Brethren Podcast from believers over CDO. Check out this episode to sample what they serve.

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8 Favorite Quotes from the Book “The Acrostic of God” (Jonathan Gibson, Timothy Brindle and C. S. Fritz)

Howdy! I want to share these quotes I like from the an upcoming children’s book, The Acrostic of God by Jonathan Gibson, Timothy Brindle and illustrated by C. S. Fritz for New Growth Press. You can support the authors by pre-ordering the book here.

“What is theology? It’s the study of God, When we see who he is, we’ll love and applaud. Not just to know about him more in our brains, But to know him as the God of glory who reigns.”

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Pinoy Reformed Recap (June 2021)

Here are my top ten favorite social media highlights of Reformed/Calvinist individuals and ministries this June. These includes upcoming events, news, blog post, podcast, books and anything that is worth checking out. In case you miss out some of my post on this blog and on other website I contribute, I have that too here. Enjoy and see you after 30 days!

Iniskwela Podcast – Pastor Joseph Mangahas of Cubao Reformed Baptist Church has a new podcast. It has a couple of episodes on Youtube and Spotify.

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The Quotable Round-Up #114

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Upon receiving my pre-release copy of the book Competing Spectacles by Tony Reinke, I immediately dive in to the book. The book is really good and fast paced to read and I want to share to you some of the great quotes from the book. Competing Spectacles will be released on April 30 but you can pre-order it on Amazon by clicking this link. While waiting for the release of the book, here are some great quotes from that book.

“Only the grand Spectacle of Jesus Christ can reach to the bottom of our loves and longings with power to shape us into something whole and beautiful.”

“The Christian’s great problem is not Hollywood or Bollywood; it’s the unchecked earthly desires that operate within our fallen selves.”

“…the greatest problem with video gaming is not that gaming is innately evil, but that it’s addictively good. Gaming taps our social competitiveness, our love of narrative, and our interest in problem solving. As gaming franchises grow, digital dreamscapes are becoming holistically immersive.”

“Our appetite for worldly spectacles gives us a sense of the expanse inside our hearts for divine spectacles. What we do with this gaze-lust of our eyes is another thing but to be fundamentally indifferent to all the visual glory of this world is not to be subhuman but to be unhuman.”

“The spectacle of the cross is an earthquake that reverberates through our lives and breaks the chains of our earthly spectacle addictions.”

The worst of our compulsive social media habits are filling our days and corroding our prayer lives.”

“The rarity of gold and silver once gave substance to the worth of cash. Today, the scarcity of human attention brings value to accrued likes and plays and shares. The ticks of human attention are the new social currency that determine the value of our media.”

Book Review: Sunny Side Up: The Breakfast Conversation That Could Change Your Life by Dan DeWitt

afdnawgI don’t usually include the sub title of a book on the title of a book review post for the reason of brevity. I think it’s enough to put the main title because it’s already striking. However in the case of Sunny Side Up, I don’t want people to get into confusion on what the book is about. You might think of it as a cookbook or those mushy generic devotionals that includes food or beverages on its title? Well it’s not. Definitely it’s about breakfast but I don’t know if they had eggs that morning. Kidding aside, what I can assure you is that Sunny Side Up is a life changer book.

The premise of Sunny Side Up is the Gospel of John, chapter 21 were Peter encountered our risen Lord. That morning talk made a difference in Peter’s life. And from that the author looks at other places in the Bible were this lowly fisherman, a denier of Christ turns into a person God want him to be. After reading this book, you’ll have a place for the apostle Peter in your heart like never before as he stumbles on issues of pride, love, following God and forgiveness that we, as believers also mess up too. Good thing God is there to pick us up.

This short book (about a short moment with Jesus and Peter) really hits every wall that hinders us to give our all to God. Truly this awkward conversation in an unusual setting shakes what we consider mundane sins to us. It’s amazing that Jesus, the Creator will have a stopover before going to heaven with a mess up fisherman named Peter. He wants also you to dine with Him. Read the book and prepare to be challenged.  If this is the breakthrough of the apostle Peter, it will also be yours.

My favorite chapter is “Cracked Eggs”. It’s the chapter about forgiveness. I know we all struggle with it and this chapter really pierced my heart and almost moved me to tears. I’m really thankful to the author for this part of the book.

Sunny Side Up is slated to be released on February 1. By then one month of 2019 is already over, but still it’s not too late to read it to start your year right. Celebrate love, humility, being a servant, following Christ and forgiveness in a fresh way from a breakfast conversation.

My verdict:

5 out of 5

Accessible Apologetics: Delighting Grace Interviews Jason Petersen

sjvengxI have read tons of apologetic books. From age of the earth to atheism, KJV onlyism to Roman Catholicism and now from evidential to presuppositional apologetics, I have read materials that covers basically those topics. But nothing has helped me look at apologetics in a more dissected view to see how it really works. I have been bogged by a jungle of terms and jargons that I didn’t see apologetics in a more understandable way. After picking up the book, Apologetics Made Simple, it dawned to me that I can view and understand  apologetics  in 5 important components.  Recently Delighting Grace connected to Jason Petersen, author of Apologetics Made Simple, and we talked about Christian handling apologetics, the presuppositional approach and his book  Apologetics Made Simple.

Delighting Grace: What are the reasons why Christians distance themselves when we talk about apologetics?

Jason Petersen: By the Holy Spirit, we know that faith is a gift from God (Ephesians 2:8). I think those who distance themselves mean well, and that they believe that the defense of the Christian faith is incompatible with faith itself. If we look at situations in the Bible that involve the defense of the faith such as Acts 17 and what the Bible says concerning defending the faith in 1 Peter 3:15, we see that the Bible does call us to defend our faith, but we are to do so in faith. We ought to exhibit the character of Yeshua when we defend the faith.

Delighting Grace: How about lack of civility? Can it hinder apologetics? What do you do when you face this kind of situation?

Jason Petersen: We do not have the power to frustrate God’s will, but we are accountable for how we behave. When someone is rude to us, we should not reciprocate. If someone will not listen when we proclaim the truth to them, we are to walk away (Proverbs 14:7, Matthew 10:14).

 

Delighting Grace: When the word apologetics comes up, we quickly picture it as Christians talking to unbelievers. But how about in church settings when we have talk it to our brethren? Is there a difference in approach?

Jason Petersen: We ought to treat everyone with the same love and respect of Yeshua. With another believer, you both should already agree that the Bible is the foundation for thought. After all, there is no need to convince someone who already believes the Bible is the Word of God that the Bible is the Word of God. The only difference would be the starting point of the person we are talking to.

Delighting Grace: Any personal story that you can share with us that you have applied apologetics?

Jason Petersen: There are many, but an example of the most common type of stories I have involve dealing with unbelievers that seem to think that Science reigns supreme over all. I recently had a discussion with an atheist named Kyle Rutherford, who says he is a scientist (I can’t remember in what field), and I explained to him all of the philosophical problems that involve claiming that the empirical method can allow us to know which propositions are true and which are not. He did not offer any response to my arguments and instead attempted to ridicule me. I departed from him because the Bible teaches us to leave the presence of a fool (Proverbs 14:7).

Delighting Grace: As I have point out previously, your e-mail address reveals you’re a presuppositional apologist. So for the readers can you tell us what’s it all about and how it differs from evidential apologetics?

Jason Petersen: Although I am a presuppositional apologist, I do believe that evidential apologetics does have its place and I have seen it bear fruit. God can use any form of apologetic for his glory so I am not dogmatic concerning how we do apologetics. I will, however, say that I think it is important that we approach our apologetic with a systematic mindset. If we are going to defend the truth of the Bible, we better darn sure be able to show how we know that it is true. This is why I am a presuppositionalist, and in particular, a Clarkian presuppositionalist.

It is hard to define evidential apologetics because there are various approaches and degrees of approaches. Some evidential apologists believe that we can show that the Bible is true apart from using the Bible. While I do think we can point to many things outside of the Bible that are consistent with the truth of the Bible, I do reject the notion that the truth of the Bible can be demonstrated apart from special revelation. It is one thing to point to things that are consistent with the truth of the Bible, but it is another to demonstrate it.

As a Clarkian presuppositionalist, I start with an axiom, “The Bible is the Word of God.” From there, I can, using the verses in the Bible, show that the Bible is true because it is inspired by God and God does not lie (2 Timothy 3:16, Numbers 23:19, Titus 1:2). This may seem strange to some, and perhaps some may be so inclined to reject such a notion as circular reasoning. I would argue that because my axiom is not demonstrable, the line of reasoning is linear, not circular. As a Clarkian presuppositionalist, I believe the only way to know that the Bible is true is if the Holy Spirit dwells within you (Romans 8:16). I also believe that the use of evidence is permissible, but what it can accomplish, as it would be with trying to prove any other position with evidence, is limited. This is a topic that I plan to hash out more in my upcoming book, ‘Clarkian Apologetics.’

Delighting Grace: How do you respond to people who say apologetics is impractical to help someone’s Christian walk?

Jason Petersen: Seeing how Yeshua, the Prophets, and the Apostles all defended the faith, I would probably sarcastically remark that none of them must have gotten the memo.

Delighting Grace: Your book, Apologetics Made Simple is absolutely great. Can you tell us about that book?

Jason Petersen: Thank you. I am glad that you enjoyed it. Ever since I started doing Apologetics, when I would dialogue with unbelievers, I could tell that something was not quite right with the discussion. It seemed like the arguments against the faith of the God of Abraham, Issac, and Jacob were all rooted in semantics and linguistic gymnastics. Over time, I was able to more precisely point out where the faults were. In 2017, I decided to publish a book that would point out five critical keys to dealing with the tricks that those who oppose the faith that was given to us by God in the days of old that would make any apologetic method unstoppable. The five keys are as follows: dogmatism, systemization, language (and propositional truth), accuracy, and faith. This book is short and only takes about an hour to an hour and a half to read. I wanted the keys shared to be easily digested even by laypeople. Both laypeople and seminary professors have said great things about this book.

Delighting Grace: Can you tell us the process of writing that book?

Jason Petersen: I did an outline of the five keys that I wanted to share, and then I expounded on those keys in every chapter. The way I write is pretty simple. Some will make a thorough outline while others will just write and “let it flow.” I do a combination of both. I do a basic outline, I let it flow, and then I read over it and determine if any changes need to be made or if I need to add to or subtract from what I’ve written. That is the approach that I took with this book.

Delighting Grace: Will you be writing books like that soon? I mean its short enough to understand the subject of apologetics and won’t eat up your time.

Jason Petersen: Apologetics Made Simple, will likely be the shortest book on apologetics that I will ever write. The books on apologetics that I will write in the future will be significantly more detailed. I won’t rule out another book that is as short as this one, but it is unlikely that I will make another Apologetics book that is like Apologetics Made Simple.

Delighting Grace: So Jason please invite our readers to get a copy of your book Apologetics Made Simple and also check out other stuff from you.

Jason Petersen: I would encourage anyone who is interested in apologetics to buy my book, Apologetics Made Simple. I am also an entrepreneur that has been blessed with financial success by God. I wrote another book called, Building Wealth Made Simple, that gives an outline on my philosophy of personal finance and investing. My author website is jasonlpetersen.com.

 

The Quotable Round-Up #86

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Howdy! It’s a great day to sit down, chill and sip your favorite drink! And while at it, add some awesomeness in your day by reading our latest collection of quotes.  This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the book “Good News: The Gospel of Jesus Christ” by John F. MacArthur Jr. And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“The message of the gospel is the message of reconciliation. The alienated sinner can be reconciled to God. That’s what we pray for, it’s what we teach, and it’s why we live. Some even die for it. It is the unparalleled message of reconciliation with God through the work of Christ. We have been given the ministry of reconciliation.”

“The only reason God has kept us in the world is for the work of evangelism. Yes, we’re saved to worship, but God tolerates our imperfect worship on this side of eternity for the sake of adding to His kingdom. We’re also saved to be sanctified, but God tolerates our inadequate, incomplete sanctification to keep us here to evangelize. He endures all our consistent errors and failures because He has work for us here that we cannot accomplish in heaven.”

“The notion that God is a loving and compassionate Savior contradicts the core doctrines of the world’s religions. If you study the history of religion, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a savior god among them. When men and demons design gods, that’s simply not how they design them. Demonic religious systems don’t concoct deities anything like the God of the Bible. Instead, they generally range from indifferent to severely hostile.”

“We need to understand that reconciliation does not start with the sinner, or some cosmic cry that God responds to. We don’t have to ask God to accept the sinner—we don’t have to coax Him into it through pressure or praise. He is not reluctant to save. Reconciliation begins with God—it’s woven into His glorious nature.”

“We don’t sit in judgment of God’s judgment. The question is not, why did God send bears out of the woods to destroy a group of boys who yelled “bald head” at a prophet (2 Kings 2:23–24)? The question is not, why did the ground open up and swallow people whole for violating Old Testament law (Num. 16)? The question is not, why did God displace and destroy the idolatrous Canaanites? The question is not, why did God destroy the globe and preserve only Noah and his family? Those questions are easy to answer: the wages of sin—no matter how great or small the sin might seem to us—is always death (Rom. 6:23).”

“True reconciliation requires God’s forgiveness. The only way reconciliation can occur is if the offended party is willing to forgive and remove the barrier sin creates. The sinner cannot reconcile himself to God. Only the Lord can effect reconciliation by choosing not to count our trespasses against us.”

“We ought to cling to the vital doctrine of God’s sovereignty. But don’t ever let your view of sovereignty overwhelm or obscure the fact that sinners have a responsibility to respond to God—and we have a responsibility to beg them to do so. God accomplishes His reconciling work through—not in spite of—the obedience of faith from those He calls to be reconciled.”

 

The Quotable Round-Up #85

tpn6bjcHowdy! It’s a great day to sit down, chill and sip your favorite drink! And while at it, add some awesomeness in your day by reading our latest collection of quotes.  This time we are featuring fresh quotes from the book “Good News: The Gospel of Jesus Christ” by John F. MacArthur Jr. And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“Ultimately, the gospel is not for the proud, the arrogant, or those who believe they can get to God by themselves. God intentionally chose a foolish message to humble us and to guarantee that no one would boast in his or her own intelligence. He chose the cross to stifle any inclination in us to think we got to Him on our own. All the glory goes to God.”

“The world must hear the message of Jesus Christ, and we have the precious privilege of serving as His ambassadors and heralds. May we never be so content with our theology—never so satisfied with our salvation and sovereign grace—that we forget that our great God has not only saved us but has also called us to be the means by which He will save others.”

“Make no mistake: the rise of postmodern Christianity and the supposed wideness in God’s mercy isn’t a harmless, potentially helpful theological perspective. It’s a direct assault on the gospel work of the church and an affront to the integrity of countless believers who suffered and died throughout its history.”

“If you can’t even muster the temerity to speak the name of Christ in public, what confidence can you have that He is faithfully interceding on your behalf? If you’re ashamed of the gospel, it’s a strong indication that you have yet to believe it. True, saving faith must not be hidden away. It ought to be the most public thing about you.”

“True believers cannot lose their salvation, but they can forfeit their joy and usefulness. They can sow confusion, doubt and discouragement into their own lives. And they can cripple their spiritual growth by imbibing the lies of false teachers and charlatans. While God alone secures and protects our eternity with Him, He has called us to be on the lookout for one another (Acts 20:29–31).”

“When we look at the life of Jesus Christ, we’re not surprised to see manifestly that He is God. If God became man, we would expect His human life to be sinless. His was. If God, the holy true God, became man, we would expect Him to live in perfect righteousness. He did. If God became man, we would expect His words to be the greatest words ever spoken. They were. If God became man, we would expect Him to exert a profound, unequaled power over humanity. He did. If God became man, we would expect supernatural demonstrations. There were many. If God became man, we would expect Him to manifest the love of God. He did.”

“Jesus never sat down and said, “You know, we’ve got so much common ground; let’s find a connection and have a conversation about the truths we can mutually affirm.” He wasn’t interested in identifying common ground or accommodating ignorance. Only the truth—the full truth— could set an Israelite or anyone else free from the slavery of sin.”