8 Favorite Quotes From the Book “The New Testament in Seven Sentences” by Gary M. Burge

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I always look forward for October because it’s our cottage prayer meeting at our house. Our cottage prayer meeting consist of having our church members come to our home, have a 30 minute devotion led by our pastor and the rest is  fellowship over a meal. October is also the birth month of my father in law, sister in law, wife and our daughter. So it’s fitting to celebrate the birthdays by having a cottage prayer meeting. This year will be held at my parents house. Aside from the birthdays it will be a thankagiving celebration because of how God sustains my father in law through his dialysis. Please consider praying for us specially that the gospel may be preach and God may open my relatives heart as they hear the message.

Anyways, here’s some quotes from book by Gary M. Burge, The New Testament in Seven Sentences, published by 10 of Inter Varsity Press. If you like these quotes, please get yourself a copy of this book by ordering at IVP.

“This is the mission of the church. This is the task of God’s people who have followed Jesus since his resurrection and ascension. We don’t simply equip people to go to heaven; we invest in kingdom building here on the earth.”

“…the Hebrew experience of God’s kingly rule had two dimensions. God ruled the present—sustaining nature and guaranteeing Israel’s present experiences in history. And God ruled the future—promising that his vision could see what was to come and his power could bring about his will. God ruled the future, and this meant he would decide how the future would unfold and how human history would end.”

“There is a difference between the experience of grace and recognizing it as a primary Christian (or Jewish) doctrine. The New Testament—from Jesus to Paul—wants to press us to return to first principles: that God has been working on our behalf throughout history and that this has been seen with pristine clarity in the arrival of Jesus.”

“The church that we know so well is thus not simply a collection of believers who have faith in Jesus. It is a community of men and women who are living out the mission given to Abraham four thousand years ago. The church is thus the “tribe of Abraham” now joined to a messianic mission that began with Jesus.”

Your identity was not exclusively anchored to what you believed intellectually about Jesus (though this was important). It was also anchored to a dynamic experience of God that could be quantified only with difficulty. As in Nicodemus’s conversation with Jesus (John 3), the Spirit is like the wind, which blows unpredictably. No one doubts its reality, but no one can calculate its movements.”

“The church in the New Testament is called the body of Christ (1 Corinthians 12:27), which means not simply that the church belongs to Christ but that he indwells the church and gives the church its life. His Spirit indwells its members and equips them to sustain Jesus’ work so that it is not a cliché when we say that we are Jesus’ hands and feet in the world.”

“These Gospel writers believed that a colossal shift had taken place in Judaism—and in the world—and they are about to tell us what it is. And they knew it was going to be controversial. The Gospel writers do not shy away from the fact that whenever this story is told in full by Jesus, crowds are either won over or they are resistant and disturbed.”

“For the New Testament, the death of Christ was a turning point in history. God had shown his righteousness by achieving in Jesus our righteousness through a dramatic act of forgiveness on the cross.”

The Quotable Round-Up #80

tpn6bjcHello guys! I hope you’re having a great day as you dive in this brand new collection of quotes! This time we are featuring fresh quotes from Chris Bruno’s book titled “The Whole Story of the Bible in 16 Verses” . And if you got stoked with these quotes, please get the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon.

“The way we think about God shapes the way we think about everything else, along with the way we act and respond to every circumstance.”

“When he had finished making everything, God looked at it all and saw that it was “very good.” Notice that God was the One who pronounced the verdict. The entire universe came to be because he spoke, and he was the only one qualified to evaluate his creative work. We don’t see the angels coming alongside God to give him some encouraging feedback. (In fact, we don’t even know when and how God created the angels, though we can be pretty sure they started praising him right away.) No, the focus at the very beginning is on God, his creation, and his authority over that creation.”

“Don’t tell the guys at Trinity Broadcasting Network, but financial prosperity is not the primary indicator of God’s blessing. Think back to the garden. What was the greatest blessing that God gave to Adam and Eve? The greatest blessing was living in God’s very presence, knowing him, and worshiping him.”

“God redeemed his people from slavery in Egypt by means of a substitute. Very early in the Bible, then, the patterns of redemption are established. In the first Passover, we see the pattern that God established in the law. The entire Mosaic covenant points forward to the need for a greater sacrifice. It points us to the promised seed.”

“Jesus, as the anointed King, the Messiah, would succeed where Adam had failed. Even though Adam was the image of God, he did not rule God’s kingdom as he should have. Neither did any of the kings in Israel or Judah. But finally here was One who would do what no other king could do. He would act as God’s representative Ruler, the true King. But in order to establish his perfect reign, he would have to be the representative servant of God, which meant he would have to suffer on behalf of God’s people.

“We saw in Isaiah 53 that the final substitute for the sins of God’s people could not be a lamb. No, it had to be one of them. It had to be the Promised One, who would represent the people and stand in as their substitute. It shouldn’t surprise us to hear Jesus say that his mission was not “to be served but to serve.” His main task as a servant was “to give his life as a ransom for many” (Mark 10:45). When he said that, he was pointing back to Isaiah 53:11–12. He was the servant.”