Book Review: The Future of Everything by William Boekestein

vtd0plnEnd times is such a sticky topic that leaves people ignoring it. And Christians are giving it a bad name through books. Books are notorious in that it they present the last things as a conspiratorial that brings paranoia to people or a dry academic one that no one wants to read.

The Future of Everything brings out the true purpose of end times by providing a very practical and personal approach on this sticky topic. Like evidential apologetics books, I also skip these kinds of books because for me it will consume my reading time, I find it boring and go into a never ending debate over the millennium. The Future of Everything is not that kind of book (thankfully). This book will reinforce your need study the last things, examine yourself in light of eternity and ignites a zeal to work for the coming Kingdom now.

I’m completely sold out with the personal eschatology section. This is my favorite part of this great book. Boekestein placed it in the early part of the book which I’m glad he did. It’s like taking the reader to look at the microscopic view first then on the next section, Boekestein lets the reader peek at a telescope to see the big picture of  the end times.

Death and dying in an eschatology book are rare but in this book the author did  something penetrating to the reader. For me this is the highlight of this section that really get readers come to terms on how the end times and their personal end times (death) intersect.

Part 3 is where the general presents the discussion about the millennium and Christ return. This is the primer part of the book. The Future of Everything is more than a primer it an action book that will drive you to toil for the Kingdom while there is time (Part 4 discusses that).

William Boekestein did an outstanding job in every section of this book. I’m very satisfied with what he want to deliver in this book. Highly recommended!

My verdict:

5 out of 5

The Quotable Round-Up #112

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It’s the last month of the first quarter of the year. How’s you reading list? What books are you reading now? If you’re on the reading challenge of Goodreads it’s great. As for me I’m lagging ahead with a couple of books to read to catch up according to them. I hope I’ll do some fast reading next time.

Anyways, here’s some quotes from William Boekestein book The Future of Everything. If you enjoyed these quotes, please do purchase the book by clicking this link.

“No one is ready to die who is not entrusting their eternity to the eternal Son of God.”

“God doesn’t give us prophecy so that we can build elaborate time lines or speculate on the precise manner in which God will keep His word. He speaks about our future so that we will live faithfully in the present. He speaks to the contemporary audience to develop in us a robust vision for the end.”

“Every election cycle tempts us to either embrace the incoming leaders as messianic manifestations of God’s salvation or cower before the new regime as a sure sign of the end of the world as we know it. A balanced eschatology assures us that our current leader is neither our savior nor one of the riders of the apocalypse, nor was the previous leader, nor will be the succeeding leader.”

“Studying the last things is like getting to the end of a novel; the entire story begins to make sense. Abraham Kuyper noted that every other division of theology “left some question unanswered, to which eschatology should supply the answer.”

“God invites us to meditate on the future, not to speculate or altercate but to better share His perspective on this life and the life to come. And this is how we should study the topic. The way Scripture and the church’s historic confessions teach eschatology is much more like gazing upon a dazzling sunset than analyzing and describing the chemical properties of the sun.”

“Speculative eschatology is a sign of biblical illiteracy and spiritual immaturity. When it comes to the end times, we need to put childish ways behind us and listen to what God says.”

“Eschatology, the study of the last things, is a fancy word for something we all already do. All of us think about the end.”

 

Book Review: “Rooted” by J. A. Medders and Brandon D. Smith

The title “Rooted” gives me the impression that this is just a “one cool word” books that are already out in the market. What got me excited is the subtitle “Theology for Growing Christians”.  So this short book is about theology. Actually they call this a “primer” that deals with the basics doctrine of Christianity. So this book doesn’t cover all the doctrines that we believers affirm.

As I read “Rooted” I can assure you that Smith and Medders really delivers and does connect the message to the readers. They know what they are saying and they can convey it in the manner that show the book is enough to be a primer and meaty enough to have great content. Medders provided an easy to digest and accessible explanations similar to his previous book “Gospel Formed” (which you should check it out too). They dropped the ivory tower jargons with millennial-friendly words which can reach believers (and unbelievers as well) whether new or seasoned.

Chapter 1 discusses the Trinity and how Godhead relates to each other. Chapter 2 zooms in the reliability of Scriptures. But I really enjoyed chapters 3 and 4 which tackle about the gospel and eschatology.

“Rooted” is the go to book to learn, unlearn and relearn about some of the basic doctrines that Christians believe. If you’re just starting or already ahead in your Christian journey and you want some map, pick this book up.

My verdict: 4.5 out of 5.

The authors of “Rooted” provided me a review copy of the book.

More book reviews here: https://delightinggrace.wordpress.com