Tag Archives: attributes of God

The Quotable Round-Up #50

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paper_zpshrjhwlqwHere are some of the quotes from the book “None Other” by John MacArthur. If you enjoy these quotes, please buy the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon. Feel free to share this post over your social media. God bless you and enjoy your week!

“God’s compassionate love is motivated not by the present value of someone but by their lost value that has been forfeited to sin.”

“The magnanimity of the love of God to the Son is that all the Father’s knowledge, all the Father’s power, all the Father’s secrets, all the Father’s privileges, and all the Father’s honor is given to the Son. The Father holds nothing back. And the Son, in perfect reciprocal love, says that all He has is only what the Father has given Him. Thus, He celebrates the expression of perfect love in consummate generosity that holds nothing back.”

“Before there was any creature to love, God was still the perfect embodiment of love, and divine love was perfectly expressed within the Trinity.”

“Some people question if Christians can affirm the love of God and still believe in hell. On the surface, the idea that God is love is the most tolerable and universally affirmed truth about Him. Almost everyone is happy that God is love as long as the definition of love is broad and simplistic. But that’s because the modern concept of love is so off base, so self-involved and self-indulgent, and so bound up in fleeting emotions and feelings.”

“The murder of Christ is unquestionably the greatest evil ever committed. But under the preordained plan of God, that act of supreme wickedness was also a supreme display of His grace, mercy, wrath, justice, righteousness, and countless other attributes.”

“The presence of evil provided the perfect opportunity for God to display His wrath and justice along with His redeeming grace and infinite mercy, as He loved sinners enough to send His Son to die in their place.”

“If you want to understand the marvelous work of salvation, you have to account for all three principles: divine sovereignty, human responsibility, and gospel duty.”

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Book Review: None Like Him by Jen Wilkin

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Oh boy where do I start with this great book? Oops! Yes I already blurted out that this book is awesome. The character of God as a subject of a book might bring in your mind outstanding authors who made a name out of that subject. Wilkin did admit in her book that authors like A. W. Tozer, R. C. Sproul etc., who wrote books on the attributes of God, did influence her in writing the subject. However consider this book as a take on the attributes of God with a female perspective.

Wilkin discuss the 10 attributes of God (infinite, incomprehensible, self-existent, self- sufficient, eternal, immutable, omnipresent, omniscient, omnipotent and sovereign) and how we finite beings try to live a life that we think we have those attributes. There are lots of things going on in this book but Jen Wilkin manage to gather it up in one place to bring us a one of a kind book on attributes of God. As she goes further and further discussing the topic it goes deeper and deeper to the heart of everyone who is reading the book. She brings forth who God is an intimate level that will not just make us guilty but stand at awe with our sovereign Creator.

“None Like Him” is well crafted book on the attributes of God that will shaken and drive us on our knees. We will get to know our finite self more and trust an infinite God. As for Wilkin, she is an author we should watch out. If you already read books by Tozer, Sproul or Pink on the attributes of God, please include this. This book is highly recommended.

My verdict: 5 out of 5

Review copy of the book is provided by Crossway.

More book reviews here: https://delightinggrace.wordpress.com

The Quotable Round-Up #26

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Hello folks!!! Here are some awesome quotes I want to share this week. May this bring you encouragement to read books and to focus on Christ.

“To possess genuine assurance is to experience a bit of divine bliss this side of heaven. The greater our sense of assurance, the more we can savor that glory in this earthly life.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ

“Christians are called to preach, teach, and believe the whole counsel of God. Any distortion of the character of God poisons the rest of our theology. The ultimate form of idolatry is humanism, which regards man as the measure of all things. Man is the primary concern, the central focus, the dominant motif of all forms of humanism. Its influence is so strong and pervasive that it seeks to infiltrate Christian theology at every point. Only by a rigorous attention and devotion to the biblical doctrine of God will we be able to keep from tasting and even swallowing this noxious brew.” –R. C. Sproul, What Is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics

“Because God is infinite in his being and eternal, and we are finite and bound by both space and time, our knowledge of him is never comprehensive. We enjoy an apprehensive knowledge of God, but not a comprehensive knowledge.” –R. C. Sproul, What Is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics

“Reformed theology is systematic. The science of systematic theology is so called because it attempts to understand doctrine in a coherent and unified manner. It is not the goal of systematic theology to impose on the Bible a system derived from a particular philosophy. Rather its goal is to discern the interrelatedness of the teachings of Scripture itself.” –R. C. Sproul, What Is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics

“A church without theology or a theology without God are simply not options for the Christian faith. One can have religion without God or theology, but one cannot have Christianity without them.”  –R. C. Sproul, What Is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics

“The believer who acquiesces in special revelation is now in a posture to respond properly to general revelation. In this regard the Christian should be the most diligent student of both special and natural revelation. Our theology should be informed by both the Bible and nature. The two come from the same revelatory source, God himself. The two revelations do not conflict; they reflect the harmony of God’s self-disclosures.” –R. C. Sproul, What Is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics

“If we say that the Bible is a product of only human opinion and insight, we can still speak about biblical theology in the sense that the Bible contains human teaching about God, but we can no longer speak about biblical revelation. If God is the ultimate Author of the Bible, we can speak of both biblical revelation and biblical theology. If man is the ultimate author, then we are restricted to speaking about biblical theology or theologies. If that is the case, we could justly regard biblical theology as a subdivision of religion, as one aspect of human studies about God.” –R. C. Sproul, What Is Reformed Theology?: Understanding the Basics