8 Favorite Quotes From the Book “Where is God In A Coronavirus World?” by John Lennox

usdvetr

Happy Lord’s Day! Are you already missing the physical gatherings every Sunday? Like you I miss it too. So let’s keep on praying for this pandemic to pass. Also we Christian should let our light shine by extending a helping hand to others during this tough times.

Anyway, here’s some quotes from the book, Where is God in a Coronavirus World? by John Lennox published by The Good Book Company. If you like these quotes, please get the book by clicking here.

“When life seems predictable and under control, it is easy to put off asking the big questions, or to be satisfied with simplistic answers. But life is not that way right now—not for any of us. It is not surprising that, whatever your faith or belief system, the big questions of life are breaking through to the surface, demanding attention.”

“Your worldview will make a difference to how you react to disasters like the coronavirus pandemic, and to earthquakes or tsunamis. “

“Beware of anyone who interprets pain caused by natural evil as a divine punishment. But equally, beware also of anyone who says that God has nothing to say through this pandemic, particularly to Western societies that have largely turned their back on him as culturally irrelevant.”

“justifiable outrage against natural or moral evil presupposes a standard of “good” that is objectively real and independent of us, so that we expect others to agree with us in condemning certain things. These standards are “transcendent”—that is, they exist above the level of individual opinions.”

“God is not taken aback by the coronavirus; he can work for good even in the evil of it, and his plans will not be thwarted by it, although in situations like the present crisis it can be very hard for us to take this on board. At the same time, we are responsible for our own responses to the crisis and to each other—for he has given us that freedom.”

“a Christian is not so much a person who has solved the problem of pain, suffering and the coronavirus, but one who has come to love and trust a God who has himself suffered.”

“Here is the problem with our natural response to God’s future judgment: we welcome God’s intervention only so long as it is an intervention in the lives of others and not in ours.”

“The coronavirus is evidence that both our relationship with creation and creation’s relationship with us are disordered; and that this is not an accident.”

The Freebie Round-Up #66

rnrjncs

The corona virus is now a pandemic and people are getting scared. However we should fight fear with take care of ourselves and pray for this infectious virus. So we should stay home for the moment and consider doing productive even at home. And there’s no better way to stay at home and download some great Christian stuff.

So here’s a list of great freebies that are waiting to be downloaded. And if you’re new here to this post or you missed out other freebie round-ups, check the links to those post at the end of this article.

Also since I’m not 24/7 monitoring the latest freebies, some publishing companies regular freebies, I’m posting their e-mail sign up page, so you’ll be in the loop whenever they give out freebies. You can find it at the of this round-up.

FREE 3 Volume Collateral Bible- If you think the 20th and 21st centuries produce great chunks of Bible based resources, think again! Download these massive (100 plus MB) free 3 Volume of the Collateral Bible for that will aid you as you study God’s Word.

FREE “Tiberian Pronunciation Tradition of Biblical Hebrew” – Our next massive freebie is this highly scholarly level resource on the Biblical Hebrew. Download it here for free.

FREE “The Sermons of Charles Spurgeon” Vol. 1-4- The last massive freebie on this round up is this 4 volume collection of 800 sermons by the Prince of Preachers. Mongerism is dishing out something that are biblical as well as monumental like this one.

FREE “Lexham Research Commentary of Genesis 1-11” – This month’s free ebook from Logos Software. Get this important title by clicking here.

FREE “The Life of Christ” course – In case you missed this one, its now back in the list. Study the life of Christ through Luke’s gospel and once signed up you’ll immediately receive lesson one. 

FREE e-book “If You Can Ask God One Question” by Paul Williams and Barry Cooper– The Good Book Company is bringing the good stuff (no pun intended). This is the March free book offeron their website.

FREE course download “Is God A Moral Monster?” by Paul Copan– This is great question answered by a great apologist, Credo courses is offering this course for free. This digital pack includes slides, PDF workbook, audio and video of the presentation.

 

Now for some e-mail list from these publisher:

10 of Those free ebook weekly

Wipf and Stock e-mail subscription

Mytrelfield House

By the way, to my Pinoy friends do you want to learn how to self-publish your book? Here’s a step by step video from Loida Bauto an AVM survivor and a PWD vlogger:

Do you want more freebies? Check out these past blog post:

Freebie Round-Up #65

Freebie Round-Up #64

Freebie Round-Up #63

Freebie Round-Up #62

Freebie Round-Up #61

Freebie Round-Up #60

 

Book Review: So The Next Generation Will Know (Sean McDowell and J. Warner Wallace

hjfucmx

One of the question we often ask when we pick up a new book is: How do I apply this to my life? Another one is: how do I make an impact to the world knowing these truths found in this book? Often enough, books do have a sort of action plan included in the book. Those parts can be found at the end of every chapters or on the epilogue. However a few page of practical applications is not enough for some heavy truths we might learn from a book.  I think that’s the task that has been laid to Sean McDowell and J. Warner Wallace in writing So The Next Generation Will Know. And they did an amazing job of pulling off a practical book that will compliment an apologetics book.

So The Next Generation Will Know is the latest book of apologist Sean McDowell and J. Warner Wallace. Renowed for their own works, they came together to deliver a book that will help Christians get down and dirty. The book is geared to basically everyone who wants to teach or already teaching apologetics in the church. It give you the how’s on teaching apologetics and mobilizing the Gen Z to live out and defend their Christian convictions. First, McDowell and Wallace opens your eyes to the reality that some Christians specially the youth are abandoning the faith through stats and personal stories. They also discuss how culture and social media shape the minds of Gen Z spiritually. Then they serve the readers practical things from Scripture and on experience. If noticed a side bar in almost all the pages of the book, it’s not just fancy after thought nor some trivial. If the main content is meaty, so is the side bar.

To be honest I’m not into books that has two authors. However this book is a exemption. McDowell and Wallace writing together in  So The Next Generation Will Know is a match made in heaven. Aside from sharing their indispensable wisdom in apologetics which is already a great help for Christians, they have a unique background that makes the book even more interesting to read.  We get to have glimpses to Sean’s moments with his father, Josh McDowell (the popular apologist) as he teaches his son living out the Christian life. Wallace on the other hand, let us peek on his life as a cold case detective. Different backgrounds but one mission: to help Christians connect to the next generation on defending the faith. For me that’s a runaway hit of a book.

You might ask: Do I have to get a book on apologetics to understand this? Of course and it’s a must. However if you have read one, read something online, already expose to the arguments in Christian apologetics or practicing it already, then I could say you don’t have to. If you  forgotten what you have read or learned, So The Next Generation Will Know has some refresher points here and there. Nevertheless, this is not a book that will give you all the details of arguments about Christianity like the usual apologetics books. You have to get it from somewhere else.

So The Next Generation Will Know is a must read because of it’s accessibility and it reeks tons of practical advice on why and how we teach apologetics. If your apologetics book lacks or doesn’t make a connection in terms of applying apologetics to real life then don’t freet.  This excellent book got you totally covered. One of my best reads so far this year.

My verdict:

5 out of 5

The Quotable Round-Up #118

yvyidve

The mid-term election is now over here in the Philippines. We can see defeats and victories of those who ran for office. Some are already proclaimed winners. Now lets get back to reality and pray for these newly elected officials that they may serve this country well. There are lots of works to do to help this country move forward. Whether you like the officials or not, keep them in prayers. And always remember the sovereignty of God over the affairs of men.

Anyways, here’s 7 quotes from the new book by Sean McDowell & J. Warner Wallace, So The Next Generation Will Know. The book review is on it’s way but if you want to get the book, click on this Amazon link to place your order.

“… a biblical worldview is grounded in biblical teaching. You can’t align your life to the truth of the Bible if you don’t even know what it says. That’s why everything begins and ends with the study of God as revealed in Scripture: theology.”

“If Christianity is considered to be just a subjective opinion (an individualistic preference about God) and not the unique and only cure for spiritual death (regardless of an individual’s personal opinion), don’t be surprised when young people treat Christianity more like a cookie than a cure.”

“Worldview is not just about the mind—it is also about the orientation of the heart. Simply put, a worldview is a fundamental commitment to reality that shapes how we live.”

“…worldview as simply a view of the world that answers three critical questions: (1) How did we get here?—Origin; (2) Why is everything so messed up?—Predicament; and (3) How can we fix it?—Resolution.”

“…every generation of young people has sought to find their place in the world. But what is different for Gen Z is the depth of loneliness many feel and the availability of endless counterfeits that claim to be able to fill their hearts with meaning.”

“The next generation of Christians faces spiritual, emotional, intellectual, and moral challenges like no prior group of believers. And much of this is because of the ubiquity of technology. Members of Generation Z face more challenges just one click away than previous generations did when they would look for it.”

“Theology and apologetics are not direction­less pursuits. They point us toward holy behaviors and provide us with answers to several questions that matter to young people.”

 

The Quotable Round-Up #117

zlhzkl3Have you watched “American Gospel”? We’ll I did this week and it was excellent. The documentary really nailed the prosperity gospel. It’s 2 hours and 19 minutes full of moving interviews and clips that will open your eyes to the deception of this movement. Here’s some quotes from the film and if you want to get copy of it click here.

“The ultimate gift of the gospel is not these all other things, it’s God Himself. God is both the giver and the gift.”
— Trevin Wax

“If someone doesn’t have the right view of the gospel, they don’t have the right view of anything.”
— Paul Washer

“There’s an assumption that unbeliver’s are seeking after God. When in reality, they are seeking after a God of their own choosing.” — Anthony Wood

“The prosperity gospel is exactly like marrying someone for their money.” — Sean Demars

“The reason why people teach that it’s always God’s will to heal and if it doesn’t the problem is them, is because that’s a good way to manipulate people. Prosperity theology means money.” — Costi Hinn

“One of the quickest way to spot a counterfeit gospel is to ask the question, ‘Who is this gospel about?’ Is this gospel or good news primarily about you and your personal happiness or is it a message about God.” — Trevin Wax

“In terms of biblical Christianity, Christianity is about dying.” — Michael Horton

 

Book Review: Five Half Truths by Flip Michaels

qgz0gls Our skeptical world has a way of presenting the truth. It doesn’t dismiss it all out but it distorts it by presenting half truths. It might have some truth in it, but as Phil Johnson points out in his introduction of this book, quoting John MacArthur, ‘Half-truth? That’s a lie. I’d rather they call it a half-lie. It’s a lie intended to cover up or mislead”. That’s were Flip Michaels new book Five Half Truths comes in. This book list down five common half truths that distorts some Christian beliefs and provides the answers or whole truth to a demanding skeptical world. A combination of striking, spot on illustrations with biblical response in a straight forward approach you’ll find this book a winner in clarity and pulls you into the book once you start read. You won’t be lost on every half truths as you read every chapters that is meat. Then in every chapter there is a short summary provided at the end.

If you have read other apologetics book with an evidential approach, you’ll find some familiar points here. But before you dismiss this book, Five Half Truths gets the cake on how five half truths points are presented. By the title itself, it grabs hold of the reader’s attention. I was so interested in this book because of the title alone. Reading it is another thing. It’s not an all out apologetics that list down arguments for and against Christianity with back and forth counter-arguments. Well the reliability of the Bible, validity of the Christian religion and the deity of Jesus Christ were there (the usual stuff evidential apologetics books). However sandwiched within those, are half truths that tackles the character of God which is love (Half Truth #3) and good deeds dealing with faith (Half Truth #5) which made the book more interesting.

I’m into presuppositional apologetics now but Five Half Truths makes me want to look at evidential apologetics again. I make it a point not to include books evidentialism on my reading list. However, this book makes me want to see this apologetic method a second look. This book shows that evidential approach is indispensible in the Christian apologetics. By the Chapter 6, we are invited to read Michaels short testimony and a gospel presentation is provided which is an excellent one. Not only that, thr book helps you in your Christian journey by turning the five half truths as a starting point to know about Him plus some recommended resource (Chapter 7).

Concise, convincing and accessible, Five Half Truths an enjoyable read for believers and non-believers alike.

My verdict:

4.5 out of 5

The Quotable Round-Up #98

uq7p3leHeads up guys! Time for some 7 awesome quotes from a Christian book. This time we shall enjoy quotes from “Always Ready” by Greg Bahnsen. If you were blessed by this book, please consider getting it on Amazon or at your nearest bookstore! Grace and Peace!

“The culpable agnosticism of the world’s intellectuals must not be reproduced in Christians as alleged neutrality; this outlook, this approach to truth, this intellectual method evidences a darkened understanding and hardened heart. It refuses to bow to the Lordship of Jesus Christ over every area of life, including scholarship and the world of thought.”

“The facts must be presented without wavering: reasoning which is not built upon the presupposed word of Christ is geared toward intellectual foolishness and spiritual death. The correction and reproof of Scripture cannot be watered down.”

“To turn away from intellectual dependence upon the light of God, the truth about and from God, is to turn away from knowledge to the darkness of ignorance. Thus if a Christian wishes to begin his scholarly endeavors from a position of neutrality he would, in actuality, be willing to begin his thinking in the dark.”

“Those who wish to gain dignity in the eyes of the world’s intellectuals by wearing the badge of “neutrality” only do so at the expense of refusing to be set apart by God’s truth. In the intellectual realm they are absorbed into the world so that no one could tell the difference between their thinking and assumptions and apostate thinking and assumptions. The line between believer and unbeliever is obscured.”

“All the treasures of wisdom and knowledge are to be found in Christ; thus if one were to try and arrive at the truth apart from commitment to the epistemic authority of Jesus Christ he would be robbed through vain philosophy and deluded by crafty deceit (see Col. 2:3-8).”

“One must be presuppositionally committed to Christ in the world of thought (rather than neutral) and firmly tied down to the faith which he has been taught, or else the persuasive argumentation of secular thought will delude him. Hence the Christian is obligated to presuppose the word of Christ in every area of knowledge; the alternative is delusion.”
“To make God’s word your presupposition, your standard, your instructor and guide, however, calls for renouncing intellectual self-sufficiency—the attitude that you are autonomous, able to attain unto genuine knowledge independent of God’s direction and standards.”

 

Collecting the Past: Delighting Grace Interviews Caleb of Log College Press

joanna-kosinska-44214-unsplash-01While Monergism.org dishes out awesome e-books of the past Christian giants, there is a new kid on the block that is solely dedicated in publishing unknown 18th-19th century American Presbyterians. As you go to their website Log College Press,  you’ll find over 1700 works by 350 authors that are free for download. So we reached out to Caleb Cangelosi, founder of Log College Press, to talk about church history, old books and of course Log College Press:

Delighting Grace:  First off, why is it important for us to look back and read materials of and about the past? In other words, how essential is history for a believer?

Caleb Cangelosi: The study of church history is vital for Christians today because we are not the first ones to study the Scriptures, wrestle with theological questions, and engage in apologetics and evangelism. God has been working in His church far before He brought us into the world. We stand on the shoulders of those who have gone before us, and have much to learn from our forefathers in the faith. As George Santayana wrote, “Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” 

The study of history also teaches us that God uses sinful saints to accomplish His purposes, and therefore gives us great hope and encouragement as we go forth into the world today. Additionally, we must recognize that our religious experience in American has been impacted by our American theological ancestors – the past is not dead. At Log College Press, we are committed to encouraging the reading of both primary and secondary sources, for it is important to hear directly from those in the past, and to understand their writings in proper historical context, so that we might rightly apply their teachings to the present. We are motivated by the conviction that as Christians in the present root themselves in the past, we will bear fruit forward into the future for the glory of God and the church of Jesus Christ.

Delighting Grace:  Can you tell us who are these authors and what is the most important contribution by this group in Christianity specifically in America?

Caleb Cangelosi: Log College Press is devoted to collecting and reprinting the writings of and about American Presbyterians from the 18th and 19th centuries. Our website contains authors from several different American Presbyterian denominations, and each of these bodies made unique contributions to the church of Jesus Christ, so it is difficult to state just one important thing they gave to America. But in general, in the books on our site you will find a commitment to the Scriptures as the inerrent, authoritative word of God; a commitment to the Westminster Standards as the summary of Scriptural teaching; a commitment to a gospel-centered and law-delighting piety; an emphasis upon the church of Jesus Christ; a focus on missions, evangelism, and apologetics; and a love for preaching (many of the writings on our site are sermon collections).

Delighting Grace:  There are already tons of Christian books out there that a Christian read. What do you think makes reading old stuff a unique experience for a Christian?

Caleb Cangelosi: C. S. Lewis put it best in his essay, “On the Reading of Old Books.” He wrote, “Every age has its own outlook. It is specially good at seeing certain truths and specially liable to make certain mistakes. We all, therefore, need the books that will correct the characteristic mistakes of our own period. And that means the old books…The only palliative [to ignoring our cultural and chronological blind spots] is to keep the clean sea breeze of the centuries blowing through our minds, and this can be done only by reading old books. Not, of course, that there is any magic about the past. People were no cleverer then than they are now; they made as many mistakes as we. But not the same mistakes. They will not flatter us in the errors we are already committing; and their own errors, being now open and palpable, will not endanger us. Two heads are better than one, not because either is infallible, but because they are unlikely to go wrong in the same direction.”

Delighting Grace:  Wow! Please tell us how Log College Press started and what goals LCP wants to target?

Caleb Cangelosi: For some time I have had the desire to create a website that collected all the digitized writings of early American Presbyterians, much as the Post-Reformation Digital Library did for the Post-Reformation period. Over the past several years I have also wanted to see some of the books and booklets that I appreciate from these authors reprinted. After not finding any publishers interested in doing these reprints, I finally decided I would try to do it myself. I quickly realized that I could kill two birds with one stone and combine my two desires into one project – Log College Press (the name is taken from the earliest American Presbyterian “seminary,” William Tennent’s Log College – as many universities and colleges have a publishing arm, I thought it a fitting name on several levels).

So Log College Press is really two things. It is a website, offering free PDF downloads of all the public domain writings we can find online (or digitize ourselves) from 18th and 19th century American Presbyterians, and a near-daily blog that discusses the authors and writings we’re putting on our site. It is also a publishing company that aims slowly but surely to reprint some of the hidden gems from these authors, and hopefully one day secondary sources about them (we also have on our website a bookstore that possibly contains one of the largest online collections of secondary sources on American Presbyterian history). The website and the publishing are both designed to bring these authors and their writings back to the knowledge of the general public, so that by taking root in the past we might bear fruit into the future.

Delighting Grace:  And some are free to download and read!

Caleb Cangelosi: Yes! We want people to be able to read the writings of this period, and so the primary service we provide is collecting in one place what is already out there on the internet. Nearly all the books on our site have been found on Google Books or Archive.org. The digitization projects of these websites is a tremendous blessing of the internet age. What formerly was hidden away in a library is now accessible with the click of a button, and can be loaded onto a tablet for easy access. We’ve done the work of locating the books and organizing them by author, so that those who are interested in this period can discover them more easily. Hopefully our work will enable these authors to reach a new audience – including an international audience who has never heard of these writings, or does not have American library access to them. I like to say that our job is that of “biblio-paleontology” – the finding of ancient books by unknown authors, who though dead can still speak God’s truth to our hearts.

Delighting Grace:  That’s one noble cause for Christians to bring these authors back. How about the process of getting these materials and putting it online. It must be interesting process, isn’t?

Caleb Cangelosi: It is indeed. Currently two of us (a gentleman named Andrew Myers, and I) work on posting books to the site. As I just mentioned, we typically locate the works we are looking for on Google Books or Archive.org. Discovering books – especially books we had not known of previously – is the best part of this work. Sometimes we have to manually scan a work ourselves, or pay a library to do that for us. Since all these works are in the public domain, it is not a legal problem to copy them and post them online.  We also clean up the PDFs, deleting blank pages to make them more visually attractive and “user-friendly.” We try to find as many pictures of the authors as we can find. That has also been a neat part of this work, because often there is only one picture that everyone thinks of with regard to a particular author – and yet there are often more pictures online, some from the authors’ youth. Seeing additional pictures can help change the way you think about a person.
Delighting Grace:  Is there a one material from LCP that has a unique backstory?

Caleb Cangelosi: Two items come immediately to mind. First, Archibald Alexander’s Lecture Notes on Systematic Theology. Not only do we see what seminary class was like back in 1818, but also the notes were taken by Charles Hodge, Alexander’s student who followed Alexander as professor at Princeton Seminary. It is not alway easy to make out his handwriting, but it is fascinating to read hand-written notes from this era. Second, Alfred Nevin’s Encyclopedia of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. This is a treasure trove of historical and biographical information, pictures, and Biblical-theological studies on important topics.

Delighting Grace:  Now that’s a gem! If a Christian wants to read books from Log College Press, which one would you first recommend and why?

Caleb Cangelosi: Of the four publications that we have put out thus far, William Swan Plumer’s Christ All in All: The Right Temper for the Theologian that would be appealing to the broadest audience. Plumer’s booklet, though originally addressed to seminary students, is an easy introduction to the writing of the period, and is so rich in its Christ-centered piety. It is also a great read for anyone who desires to study theology, for Plumer teaches the manner in which one ought to approach this joyful task.

If any of your readers are pastors or teachers, they should definitely buy Francis Grimke’s Meditations on Preaching (about the glorious calling of feeding God’s sheep with the truth of Christ), or C. W. Grafton’s A Forty-Three Year Pastorate in a Country Church (about small-town ministry). Finally, if anyone is interested in learning more about Presbyterianism, Thomas Dwight Witherspoon’s The Five Points of Presbyterianism is a great introduction. We are about to publish Archibald Alexander’s Aging in Grace: Letters to Those in the Autum of Life (about the trials of growing old, and the Christian’s hope beyond the grave).

Delighting Grace:  How about those freebies? What is your Top 5 must read from the Free PDF Library?

Caleb Cangelosi: This is a very difficult question, as we currently have on our site over 1750 works by over 350 authors! But here are five that I would recommend:

  1. Archibald Alexander’s Biographical Sketches of the Founder, and Principal Alumni, of the Log College – to learn more about the history of the Log College and early American Presbyterianism.

 

  1. William Catto’s A Semi-Centenary Discourse – A History of the the First African Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, and a Brief Notice of Rev. John Gloucester – to learn about early African-American Presbyterians.

 

  1. Henry Alexander White’s Southern Presbyterian Leaders– biographical sketches of Presbyterians in the 19th century Southern United States.

 

  1. William Swan Plumer’s Commentary on the Psalms (or Hebrews orRomans)– commentaries filled with exegetical insights and practical wisdom for the Christian life.

 

  1. Stuart Robinson’s Discourses on Redemption– a great study of the gospel from Genesis through Revelation; a 19th century Biblical theology.

 

Delighting Grace:  Thank you for this interview Caleb, so please invite our readers to go check Log College Press and share us your social media accounts so we can get in touch with LCP.

Caleb Cangelosi: Thank you so much for the privilege of communicating to your readers what we are doing! We would love for them all to visit our site (www.logcollegepress.com) and browse our free library, our blog archives, and our bookstore. We are giving away a free ebook on our home page, so your readers should definitely take advantage of that (currently, it’s William Swan Plumer’s Christ All in All: The Right Temper for a Theologian). Your readers can also sign up to receive our blog posts in their email inbox (this is a great way to learn more about the authors and works on our site). We are also on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. To keep the website going, and to enable us to reprint more works, please buy our publications! I don’t currently ship to the Philippines, but I do sell ebooks (in Kindle and EPUB formats), so international readers can purchase them. We also sell our books on Amazon. If anyone has more questions, there is a contact form on our website. We would love to hear from them!

The Quotable Round-Up #72

tpn6bjcHappy New Year to all!!! To jump start this year here’s couple of quotes from J. P. Moreland’s book “Love Your God With All Your Mind”. May these quotes be your guide this year on what books you’ll buy and read. God bless and Enjoy Jesus!

“Have you been afraid to stand up for Christ when the opportunity presented itself? Or when you have done so, have you come off as shallow, reactionary, and defensive? If so, there is nothing magical about changing your life in this area. First, as with every other area of life, you have to study hard and gain an intellectual grasp of the issues so you can be confident and courageous. Second, you need to be sure that Jesus Christ is the Lord of your life; that is, you are to serve His name, not make one for yourself.”

“We must develop intelligent Christians; that is, Christians who have the mental training to see issues clearly, make important distinctions carefully, and weigh various factors appropriately. If we are not really planning to see this happen, then at the end of the day, what we are really saying is that a deep understanding of the Scripture, creeds, and theology of Christianity just doesn’t matter that much.”

“Is it any wonder that we Christians started the first universities and have planted schools and colleges everywhere our missionaries have gone? Is it any wonder that science began in Christian Europe because of the belief that the same rational God who made the human mind also created the world so the mind would be suited to discern the world’s rational structure placed there by God? God is certainly not a cultural elitist, and He does not love intellectuals more than anyone else. But it needs to be said in the same breath that ignorance is not a Christian virtue if those virtues mirror the perfection of God’s own character.”

“Individual rights are important, and, for the Christian, they are grounded in the image of God and not in the state. In other words, the Christian believes that human rights are derived from the image of God in us; they do not ultimately come from the state.”

“Religion is now viewed by many as a placebo or emotional crutch precisely because that is how we often pitch the gospel to unbelievers.”
“Today, we share the gospel primarily as a means of addressing felt needs. We give testimonies of changed lives and say to people that if they want to become better parents or overcome depression or loneliness, then Christ is the answer for them. As true as this may be, such an approach to evangelism is inadequate for two reasons. First, it does not reach people who may be out of touch with their feelings. Consequently, if men in our culture are, in general, less in touch with their feelings than women, this approach will not reach men effectively. Second, it invites the response, “Sorry, but I don’t have a need.”

“The church must train high school students for the intellectual life they will encounter at college. As theologian Carl Henry put it, “Training the mind is an essential responsibility of the home, the church, and the school. Unless evangelicals prod young people to disciplined thinking, they waste — even undermine — one of Christianity’s most precious resources.”

 

 

The Quotable Round-Up #57

paper_zpshrjhwlqwHere are some of the quotes from the book “We Destroy Arguments” by Stephen Feinstein. If you enjoy these quotes, please buy the book at your nearest Christian bookstore or on Amazon. Feel free to share this post over your social media. God bless you and enjoy your week!

“Christians are not out there to prove that a god exists, but instead that the biblical God exists. We are to prove that this biblical God has made Himself clearly known to all people at all times with clear distinct revelation that has left people without excuse. You cannot accomplish this by using piecemeal arguments that only demonstrate one sliver of the Christian worldview at a time. Instead, the Christian worldview as a whole is what is to be presented. Yet, it is even more than this. Christianity must be presented not only as an entire system, but as the only system of truth that is even possible.” – Stephen Feinstein, “We Destroy Arguments”

“When 1 John 4:8 declares that God is love, we need to ask, “Love of what?” If the answer is love of the world, then the divine attribute of love depends on the existence of the world, once again removing the independence of God and the creator-creature distinction. Furthermore, an attribute by definition is something that God must possess to in fact be God. If love could not exist until the creation existed, then God also could not have existed as God until He first created the creation! The position becomes logically self-defeating. Yet, if God is one, and yet three persons, then God can share love in an absolute sense being an absolute person and still be absolutely independent of creation. John 17:24 clearly teaches that the Father and Son loved each other in eternity past, thereby demonstrating from Scripture that God’s attribute of love is independent of the creation. Thus, the Trinity actually is necessary in order to keep every single one of God’s communicable attributes intact.” – Stephen Feinstein, “We Destroy Arguments”

“Under the Christian, metaphysical worldview God is only one God and is a perfect unity, but is also a unity of a plurality (three persons). Since God is a unity of plurality, it is not difficult to see creation in a similar light. We are all made from the dust of the ground making us one with creation (unity), but we are different ontologically from plants, animals, rocks, and other humans (plurality). There is no absolute unity devoid of plurality, and there is no absolute plurality devoid of unity. Only the Christian worldview accounts for this, and even though many secular philosophers and pagan religions reject a universe of both one and many, nearly all people live their day-to-day lives as though it were true.” – Stephen Feinstein, “We Destroy Arguments”

“Dependence on God leads to consistent and true knowledge and a consistent view of reality that makes learning and discovery possible. Independence from God leads to millions of inconsistencies on various views of reality, and it renders the idea of true knowledge and standards as impossible.” – Stephen Feinstein, “We Destroy Arguments”

“Atheism can be theoretical or practical, or both. The theoretical atheist outright denies the existence of God, whereas the practical atheist just lives as though there is no God. Based on the definition of practical atheism, agnostics truly are atheists just in disguise. After all, if they truly did not know whether or not God existed, would they not show up to church every other week and try to live in obedience to Scripture half of the time in order to shore up their bets? Yet, just about every agnostic most of us have ever met never goes to church and live their lives as though no God exists. Their words do not comport with their actions but instead are a mere attempt to take some misconstrued highroad of humility.” – Stephen Feinstein, “We Destroy Arguments”

“Ultimately, the combination of atheism and idolatry is the unbeliever’s way of suppressing the truth of God that is within them, and yet being able to navigate through the world with set standards. When the Christian apologist begins to critique unbelieving thought, unbelievers will move thoughtlessly back and forth between these two positions making it difficult to pin them down. For example, when you press their relativism to its conclusion, they will then appeal to reason (their idol) to support the items that they feel are absolutely true. When you then push them with reason into a self-defeating position, they will effortlessly move right back into their atheistic relativism. It will take patience and skill to reveal this to them, and ultimately it will take the work of the Holy Spirit.” – Stephen Feinstein, “We Destroy Arguments”

“If a Christian presuppositionalist pushed epistemology with such atheists, he could easily reveal to the atheist the impossibility of objective truth in an atheistic worldview. Thus consistent atheism requires the extreme of relativism, which itself is self-defeating. After all, would not a declaration that there is no absolute truth be in of itself an absolute truth? Furthermore, the atheist who holds to relativism is never consistent with it. After all, he acts as though reason and logic are trustworthy (absolute) and would seek justice if robbed (a moral absolute). Thus, the unbeliever committed to atheism in either its theoretical or practical form is left in a state of absolute certainty (rationalism) and absolute uncertainty (irrationalism) simultaneously and cannot account for it.” – Stephen Feinstein, “We Destroy Arguments”