8 Favorite Quotes From the Book “Our Good Crisis” by Jonathan K. Dodson

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Anyway, here’s some quotes from the book, Our Good Crisis by Jonathan K. Dodson published by InterVarsity Press. If you like these quotes, please get the book by clicking here.

“Moral or ethical failure is often behind the crises that put us up in arms or down in the dumps. A failure of morals,
not nerve, lurks behind scandal and injustice.”

“The seed of every crisis exists in every one of us. No one is immune. But  if we can get a handle on our moral turbulence, we can ­contribute not only to our own good but also to the good around us.”

“The sermon opens with a series of declarations—beatitudes—that call for goodness. Beatitude is a strange but compelling word.  It comes from the Latin word beatitudo, which is a translation of  the Greek word makarios, meaning blessed, favored, or flourishing. The Beatitudes show us eight ways to live a blessed life (or nine, depending how you read Matthew 5:10‑12). “

” the Beatitudes is plural not singular—the poor, those who mourn, the humble, the merciful. Every subject is plural, which means Jesus isn’t calling just individuals to the character of the kingdom; he’s calling a whole community—the church—to be poor in spirit. “

“The kingdom of heaven is breaking into this world through God’s people. If you are already a citizen by the grace of God, live like it! Don’t settle for the kingdom of self.”

“When we are honest with God about our sins, forgiveness and comfort come rushing in. When we get beneath the routine busyness of life and discover we aren’t as noble or moral as we thought, mourning in the presence of the Comforter guides us to a better version of ourselves.”

” With Christ, the greatest and humblest of beings mystically indwelling us by faith, we don’t have to assign ourselves weight. We don’t have to conjure a lovely idea of the self. Instead a glory outside us comes to live in us: Christ in us, the hope of glory. Jesus secured this glory for us through his debt-paying death on the cross and his mighty resurrection: his injury for our reward, his obedience for our disobedience, his righteousness for our unrighteousness. It hardly seems fair. That’s grace! “

“Today insisting on exclusive allegiance to Jesus as the one true God and Savior of humanity is also radical. It’s a declaration of war against the cult of expressive individualism. It’s unpopular
to denounce the self, but it isn’t enough to confess Jesus as Lord. His lordship must be visible. It isn’t enough to have great theology about Jesus and claim him as your king. It isn’t enough to
say he is the God and there is no other. Rather our allegiance to him must be evident in our character and action. We must care for the poor, practice righteousness, seek purity, and make
peace with others. The Beatitudes of Jesus must define us. “

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