8 Favorite Quotes from The Book “Write Better” by Andrew T. Le Peau

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I’m half way in reading this great book from Andy Le Peau and I decided to share my first eight favorite quotes from the book (as of now there are many quotes I love). I’ll have part 2 of my favorite quotes once I finish reading this book. Also please watch out for this blog for the interview of Andy. What’s the interview about? Well of course about his book, Write Better and the other one is something I’ll keep for now to give you some suspense. Just wait for the interview guys!

Anyways, here’s some quotes from book, Write Better published by Inter Varsity Press. If you like these quotes, please get yourself a copy of this book by ordering at IVP.

“Essentially, creativity isn’t concocting something entirely unprecedented. Rather it is bringing together two things that have been around for a while but previously hadn’t been combined. Innovation almost always involves building on the past.”

“We all know titles are important for the success of a book. If we are
self-publishing or titling a blog post, readers will decide to keep going or not based on those few words. Titles can even be important in getting a project a second look from an editor or agent. They are the first audience we may try to capture. So we shouldn’t be satisfied with a placeholder title, the first thing that comes into our head, even when submitting a proposal. We beer to work at it.”

“Always carry a small notebook or a smart phone with a note-taking app so you can put things down right away. Ideas can come to mind at any time—while talking to someone, watching a movie, taking a walk. Write down anything that could be developed later—a character’s name or a piece of her backstory, an illustration for a point in an article, a news item, or a vivid descriptive phrase.”

“Rhetorically, word-for-word repetition is far more effective in speaking than writing. In speaking, repetition can drive home points and implant them firmly in our memories. Repetition in writing must be done carefully and subtly. Too much direct repetition in writing is usually boring, tedious, and boring.”

“Stories aren’t just window dressing. They are every bit as much part of your content as the information or advice you might include. They are bound to stick with us long after the information has been forgotten. In fact, stories can be better than mere data because they are richer, embracing more depth, detail, and dimensions than a statement can. A story can tell us more (and in many ways it tells us more accurately) than a series of propositional statements which inevitably must leave out much.”

“Simplicity extends beyond vocabulary to the overall ideas you want to communicate. If you can’t explain the main concept of your piece in thirty-seconds, you are probably in trouble. This means you may need to limit the range of topics covered or keep working till you can express your key thought in a sentence or two.”

“When thinking about our audience, we should try to be as specific as possible—age range, economic status, religious background, ethnicity, geographic location, life experiences, and so forth. In fact, I encourage writers to pick out one person they know that they would love to have read their work. Then write for that one person.”

“The lesson for nonfiction authors. While opening with a strong, compelling story is always a good option, be sure the story is consistent with your main point as well as your target audience.”

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