The Quotable Round-Up #116

znu4bd1Log College Press has a latest book that I recently received. A Place Like Heaven by Samuel Miller tackles Synod of Dort, an important event for the doctrine of grace, with an American Presbyterian perspective.  My book review is on the way but for now, you can be assured that this is a great book and you can get it through Amazon by clicking this link. Here’s some nuggets from the book that I hope you’ll enjoy.

“It was fondly hoped by many that when Arminius died, the controversy to which his speculation had given rise, would have died and been buried with him. But this, unhappily, by no means, proved to be the case.”

“When heresy rises in an evangelical body, it is never frank and open. It always begins by skulking, and assuming a disguise.”

“The opinions denominated Arminian had been substantially taught long before Arminius appeared. The doctrine of Cassian, of Marseilles, in the fifth century, commonly styled Semi-Pelagianism, was almost exactly the same system. Bolsec, too, in Geneva, about the year 1552, according to some, had also taught very much the same doctrine, though justly regarded as infamous on account of his shameful moral delinquencies. And about fifteen or twenty years before Arminius arose, Corvinus, in Holland, had appeared as the advocate of opinions of similar import. But having less talent than Arminius, and being less countenanced by eminent men, his error made little noise, and was suffered quietly to sink into insignificance, until a stronger and more popular man arose to give it new consequence, and a new impulse.”

“Perhaps it may be said, that no theological system was ever more grossly
misrepresented, or more foully or unjustly vilified than that which is commonly
called Calvinism; but which had been drawn from the word of God, and preached
by some of the best men that ever lived, many hundreds of years before Calvin
was born.”

“The enemies of the system allege, that it represents God as really the author
of sin, and man as laid under a physical necessity of sinning, and then as damned
for it, do what he can. They insist that our doctrine of depravity, and the mode
of inheriting it, if true, destroys moral agency; reduces men to the condition of
mere machines; and, of course, makes all punishment of sin unjust and absurd. In
short, they contend, that the views which we give of the plan of salvation, makes a system of heathenish fate, or of refined Antinomianism, equally destructive
of holiness and of comfort; and that, under the guise of free grace, we build up
a fabric of favoritism on the one hand, and of fixed necessity on the other; at
once making God a partial being, and a tyrant, and man a mere passive subject
of his arbitrary will. But, is it true that Calvinists embrace any such system as
this? Nothing can be further from the truth. It is a shameful misrepresentation,
which has no correspondence with anything but the caricatures of prejudice
and bigotry.”

 

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