Monthly Archives: March 2016

The Quotable Round-Up #24

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Here are the freshest quotes for the week featuring John MacArthur’s book “The Truth About the Lordship of Christ. Enjoy!

“God’s love and the love of His children is forgiving, unconditional, and self-sacrificing, but you can be sure Satan will pervert that. Worldly love is shallow, selfish, sensual, and sexual, and Satan has sold that definition of love to the world.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“When we are thankful for everything, we step outside ourselves, because thanksgiving is directed toward God.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“Instead of taking from people, love them in a way that communicates thankfulness. Remember, God’s love is unselfish and thankful, but the world’s love is selfish and thankless.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“We also are commissioned by God to verbally expose the evil of the world. We must diagnose it, confront it, and then offer the solution. Sin is a cancer that must be removed. You aren’t helping anyone by ignoring it. People need to be convicted about their sin before they will ever see their need for a Savior.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“Repentance is no more a meritorious work than its counterpart, faith. It is an inward response. Genuine repentance pleads with the Lord to forgive and deliver from the burden of sin and the fear of judgment and hell.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“Repentance is not merely behavior reform. But because true repentance involves a change of heart and purpose, it inevitably results in a change of behavior.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“True assurance is a taste of heaven on earth.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ

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The Quotable Round-Up #23

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Here are the freshest quotes for the week featuring John MacArthur’s book “The Truth About the Lordship of Christ. Enjoy!

“The source of our love is its very object, the One who is the essence of love, whether expressed in consolation or in wrath and judgment.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“The Christian life could be summed up in this one statement: be mimics, or imitators, of God.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“Imitating God may be easy to discuss, but it is difficult to do. You cannot do it in your own strength. But Jesus gave us the starting point for imitating God in the Sermon on the Mount. We need to mourn over our sin with a broken and contrite spirit. When we are overwhelmed by our sinfulness, we will hunger and thirst for righteousness.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“The Bible doesn’t refer to Christian love as an emotion but as an act of self-sacrifice. A person who truly loves someone else doesn’t try to get anything out of that person. That’s because godly love is never conditioned on a response—it is unconditional.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“The world often defines love in terms of what it can get. But God loves even if He never gets anything in return. If that kind of love characterized our marriages, the divorce rate wouldn’t be what it is today.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“Our Lord Jesus Christ doesn’t love us for what He can get out of us; He loves us in spite of the hurt we cause Him. Make unconditional love your goal, and be humble, obedient, and self-sacrificing.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ
“The world’s love is unforgiving, conditional, and self-centered. It focuses on desire, self-pleasure, and lust—the very opposite of God’s perfect love. People search for love, but it’s not true love; it is Satan’s perversion.” – John MacArthur, The Truth About the Lordship of Christ

Book Review: Gospel-Centered Youth Ministry: Practical Guide by Cameron Cole and Jon Nielson

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There are few books that are geared for this kind of topic. The most notable and most popular is the “Purpose Driven Youth Ministry” by Doug Fields which really sets the bar of what an effective and practical guide in youth ministry. Fields mostly sets the program (complete with diagrams, templates, graphs) which is comprehensive. He shared some biblical insights here and there. But in “Gospel-Centred Youth Ministry”, having the gospel in the very heart of this kind of ministry IS practical.
To tell you honesty I have no idea who are the editors and contributors except for Elizabeth Elliot and the Collin Hansen (who wrote the foreword). However, that didn’t deter me to check this book out. Unlike other how to books with one author in every topic, Gospel-Centered Youth Ministry” the contributors provides their forte in every phase of the youth ministry. Sharing biblical insights, personal experiences and practical tips every entry bring reinforcement to youth workers who needs help for this ministry. The book is divided into three sections: foundations of an effective ministry, four practical elements of the ministry and students role in reaching out the world.
Gospel-Centered Youth Ministry: Practical Guide is must read for youth workers, pastors and lay people. This book is the real deal. It delivers a gospel saturated message that is not full of gimmicks or quick fix.

 

Crossway has provided a complimentary copy of this book through the Blog Review Program.

The Quotable Round-Up #22

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Here are the freshest quotes from your favorite Christian authors. May this bring encouragement to you throughout the week. Enjoy!
“Seeing, then, that Christ has gloriously arisen, being raised by the power of the Father, there is no room left for doubt respecting the perfection of the satisfaction, the full payment of the price of redemption; of the full discharge of which, the Father has given us such indubitable testimony.”
— Francis Turretin, The Atonement of Christ

“For though Christ’s human nature, which was the instrument in the obedience and sufferings, was finite, yet this does not lessen the value of the satisfaction, because it derives its perfection from the divine person of Christ, to which all his actions must be attributed; as he is the person who obeyed and suffered.”
— Francis Turretin, The Atonement of Christ

“Though a death of infinite value was due for every individual sinner, yet such a death as Christ’s is quite sufficient for the redemption of the whole elect world.”
— Francis Turretin, The Atonement of Christ

“God didn’t simply wind up the universe, letting it largely run by itself. The universe isn’t like that. Instead, nothing would continue to exist—the universe, the angels, you—if God did not continually sustain it. Nor would anything in the universe do anything without his causing it, either directly or indirectly.” —Mitch Stokes, A Shot of Faith in the Head

“Christ did not suffer eternal death but a death of three days only, and yet he fully paid the debt of everlasting punishment which we owed. His, which was one of finite duration, was equivalent to an everlasting death suffered by us, because of the infinite dignity of his person. His were the sufferings not of a mere man, but of the true God, who purchased the Church with his blood, (Acts 20:28). Hence what was deficient in duration is supplied by the divinity of the sufferer, which gave infinite importance to a temporary passion.”
— Francis Turretin, The Atonement of Christ

“The warfare view of science and religion has seeped into the soil of Western civilization, poisoning our water. It doesn’t matter that modern research has shown, for example, that the scientists involved in the development of modern science during the 1600s were Christians. Never mind that Newton, the culmination of the Scientific Revolution, was a devout Christian who wrote far more on theology than all other subjects combined. The cleanup is going to take a long time.” —Mitch Stokes, A Shot of Faith in the Head

“Justice and mercy kiss each other. Justice is exercised against sin as imputed to Christ, and mercy, free and sovereign mercy, is shown to sinners. The pardon granted to us is entirely of grace, while full satisfaction is demanded of the surety. Nothing is demanded of us, full payment having been made by Christ.”
— Francis Turretin, The Atonement of Christ

Comicbook Review: MA-I Book 1: Si Lakan by Arya Chelabian and Faye Villanueva

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Starting this week we will check out a comicbook published by Kawangis Komiks an imprint of Church Strengthening Ministry (CSM). This 5 part series are written and drawn by the dynamic husband and wife tandem of Arya Chelabian and Faye Villanueva. A 5 part book of what they call a Pinoy Manga is something that will First stop is Book 1 of the series is “Si Lakan.”
“Si Lakan” introduces us to the world of MA-I on which the adventures in the series will unfold. Also we will meet our hero of the story, Lakan. Lakan is an adventurous young man who stumbles upon MA-I. His grandfather, Apo Sulatn forbids him to go to MA-I because that place is dangerous. And indeed the next day, going back to MA-I proves the dangers it possess as Lakan and Apo Sulatn got into trouble.
In a few pages this book it already got me hooked! Its action, drama and humor sucked me into reading till the end. It’s a fast phase read for me but the way the story reveals its self amazed me. The adventure story presented in this book is a staple in anime or manga (yet we don’t get tired of that kind of story, right?) The artwork has its high and lows but then again how it blends with the story as it unfolds in every panel is impressive. The tandem of Arya and Faye is awesome. They can really convey the demands of every panel. If you’re a bit conscious on the Pinoy culture thing in this comicbook, don’t worry. You can pick up that stuff along the way as you read it. In fact you can skip the explanations and just dive in to the story. The spiritual stuff is OK but I expect more in the succeeding books.
As an opening salvo of the series, “Si Lakan” delivers the action, the humor and the culture that will hook and entertain you. A good read whether you’re a traditional komiks or manga fan.

The Quotable Round-Up #21

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Here are the freshest quotes from your favorite Christian authors. May this bring encouragement to you throughout the week. Enjoy!
“Truly God is love. Love is not something adventitious; it is not something that God may choose to be or choose not to be. He is love, and that necessarily, inherently, and eternally. As God is spirit, as he is light, so he is love.”
— John Murray, Redemption: Accomplished and Applied

“It’s safe to say, that although we can observe God’s handiwork, we cannot observe him. This is one reason why some people think science and religion constitute entirely separate realms. Science studies what we can observe; religion—insofar as it regards God himself—obviously does not. But this characterization is wrong. For one thing—and most importantly for us here—not everything we learn from science can be observed. No one has ever observed an atom or seen the earth move. Yet it is entirely reasonable to believe in atoms and the earth’s motion.” —Mitch Stokes, A Shot of Faith in the Head

“It cannot be said that God demands a double payment of the same debt. For the law binds the sinner both to obedience and punishment, as is said above; and the actions and sufferings of Christ do not constitute a double payment, but both together constitute one payment; one unique righteousness, by which deliverance from death and a right to life have been acquired for us.”
–Francis Turretin, The Atonement of Christ

“The love of God from which the atonement springs is not a distinction-less love; it is a love that elects and predestinates. God was pleased to set his invincible and everlasting love upon a countless multitude and it is the determinate purpose of this love that the atonement secures.”
— John Murray, Redemption: Accomplished and Applied

“As Christ, by the obedience of his life, has rendered to the law that which it required of us, and to which we were otherwise personally bound; so by this obedience he has satisfied the law, as to those demands which it makes upon us: and hence his active obedience partakes of the nature of satisfaction. Again, as his passive obedience proceeded from unspeakable love to us, and as love is the fulfilling of the law, we cannot deny but it was meritorious, and of the nature of a price of redemption, by which a right to life has been acquired for us.”
— Francis Turretin, The Atonement of Christ

“Perhaps this unwarranted confidence in evolution is the result of desperation. Humans—as Aristotle noted—desire to know. They especially want to know things like where humans came from and what they’re here for. And evolution offers one explanation—the only explanation in sight for atheists. Because evolution has the market cornered, atheists really want to make this theory work.” —Mitch Stokes, A Shot of Faith in the Head

“We do not grant that Christ gives us any power to atone for ourselves. Such a supposition receives no countenance from Scripture, and is contrary to the very nature of an atonement. It is one thing to make satisfaction, another to give the power to make satisfaction.”
— Francis Turretin, The Atonement of Christ

5 Uncomfortable Situations That You Can Still Find God (Part 1)

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Where has life lead you today? Are you walking in places that you feel that God is not there? We have all been there. We all know the heartaches it brings. It feels like God has abandoned us. The truth is God is there and doesn’t mind to be there for us. God is not always in place we are happy. He is also there in those times that we feel that He is not there to help us. As we read our passage for this lesson we can see that Jerusalem is besieged by the Babylonians. Some of them were carried to Babylon and some are left in the midst of the ruins. Judgment befalls the people of God because of their constant rebellion to God. But still in the midst of God’s righteous anger, He still extents His goodness to remnants as they seek for Him. These remnants came to the prophet Jeremiah to inquire for God. Let us look at our passage then go to our first point:
Then all the captains of the forces, and Johanan the son of Kareah, and Jezaniah the son of Hoshaiah, and all the people from the least even unto the greatest, came near,
And said unto Jeremiah the prophet, Let, we beseech thee, our supplication be accepted before thee, and pray for us unto the LORD thy God, even for all this remnant; (for we are left but a few of many, as thine eyes do behold us:)—Jeremiah 42: 1-2

1.) When people around you are few
“pray for us unto the LORD thy God, even for all this remnant; (for we are left but a few of many, as thine eyes do behold us:)”—Jeremiah 42: 2
I can easily relate with this because of our small church. As our church goes to challenges that really shook us, we are few in numbers. Sometimes we get discourage of our number that we tend to look at how big churches do. We long for that quantity of members and also the quality of the leaders. We desire and pray of kind of ministry that is growing. Frustrations set in when some of our members left our already small church. For me this is one difficult time that really pulls our strength.
But this verse tells us that God is willing to meet these rebellious remnants (see verse 9). If God is reaching out for the welfare of these stubborn people, how much more to us that didn’t jump over board. Despite on what situation we are on whether it’s a small church, a minority in our place, or a leader with a handful of loyal follower God is willing to meet us there in that circumstances. Do we feel small, insignificant and unworthy because we keep seeing the stats and not God? Remember the people in the ark, Gideon’s army and the people at the foot of Christ’s cross. Remember this group of remnants. Remember God is there and willing to deal with us.
(To be continued next week…)